draft registration

Where did they go?: Arkansas World War II draft registrations, no. 2.

In the 1880s and ’90s, thousands of African-Americans left North Carolina for Arkansas, seeking better fortune. Many settled in the east-central part of the state, including the families of these World War II draft registrants.

  • Edward Adams

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  • Fred Barnes

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In the 1930 census of Johnson township, Saint Francis County, Arkansas: cotton and corn farmer Fred Barnes, 39; wife Rosy, 24; and son Edward, 8.

  • Sidney Watson Cooper

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In the 1900 census of Pine Bluff, Jefferson County, Arkansas: Smithee Baker, 44, day laborer, and sons George, 22, Sidny, 19, and Bruce Cooper, 9, all born in North Carolina.

In the 1920 census of Melton township, Jefferson County, Arkansas: widower Sidney Cooper, 40, farmer.

  • William Henry Daniels

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In the 1900 census of Pine Bluff, Jefferson County, Arkansas: at 1013 West 8th Avenue, Henry Daniels, 55; wife Elizabeth, 46; and children William H. 17, Matilda A., 15, Mary J., 13, and Rice B., 4. Only Rice was born in Arkansas.

In the 1940 census of Pine Bluff, Jefferson County, Arkansas: steam railway laborer Wm. H. Daniel, 56; wife Willie M., 52, laundress; children Dorotha, 19, Wm. Henry Jr., Zereta, 14, Floyd, 13, Eloise, 11, and Robert 9; and father[-in-law] William Floyd, 83.

  • Eli Farmer

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In the 1900 census of Cold Water township, Cross County, Arkansas: farmer Peter Farmer, 73; wife Mariah, 51; children John Farmer, 28, widow Margaret Bunn, 21, and Isaac, 18, Eley, 17, and Louisa Farmer, 15; and grandchildren Sanders, 6, and Theodrick Bunn, 5. All but the grandchildren were born in North Carolina.

In the 1940 census of Wappanocca township, Crittenden County, Arkansas: widower Eli Farmer, 58, farm operator, and widowed sister Maggie Newson, 60, both born in North Carolina.

  • Henry Horn

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In the 1940 census of Dermott township, Chicot County, Arkansas: Nazzie Horn, 43; North Carolina-born husband Henry, 52; and widowed sister Sallie Garman, 64.

  • Hardy William Lassiter

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In the 1930 census of Pine Bluff, Jefferson County, Arkansas: at 910 East 19th Avenue, Hardy Lassiter, 40, sealer of cars for freight office; wife Ruby, 37; and widowed mother-in-law Ella Epperson, 56, washerwoman. Per Find-A-Grave.com, Hardy Lassiter, born 31 January 1887 and died 26 November 1976, was buried in Little Rock National Cemetery, Little Rock, Arkansas.

  • Will Lewis

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In the 1900 census of Spring Creek township, Lee County, Arkansas: farmer Kention Lewis, 50; daughter Cora, 23; and sons John, 22, Bill, 17, and Arthur, 15. The sons were born in Arkansas.

  • Luther Lucas

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In the 1900 census of Searcy township, Cross County, Arkansas: farmer Ephram Lucas, 44; wife Annie, 34; and children Luther, 11, Annie, 5, Rezella, 4, and Etta, 1. Luther and his parents were born in North Carolina, Annie in Mississippi, and the youngest children in Arkansas.

  • Charley McDowell

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In the 1940 census of Pennington, Bradley County, Arkansas: North Carolina-born Charlie McDowell, 46, contract lumber stacker at saw mill; wife Minny, 37; and children Herbert, 21, Floyd C., 18, James L., 16, Edward, 13, and Don A[illegible], 1.

U.S. WWII Draft Cards Young Men, 1940-1947, [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com.

Where did they go?: Arkansas World War II draft registrations.

In the 1880s and ’90s, thousands of African-Americans left North Carolina for Arkansas, seeking better fortune. Many settled in Lonoke, Jefferson and Pulaski Counties in the east-central part of the state, including the families of these World War II draft registrants.

  • Jethro Aycock

In the 1880 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: farmer Samuel Acock, 36; wife Jane, 35; and children Sam, 15, Fannie, 13, Harrett, 12, Amos, 10, Emma, 8, Mattie, 6, Hannah L., 4, Maggie, 2, and Jeathroe, 1.

  • Peter Aycox

In the 1900 census of Barraque township, Jefferson County, Arkansas: farmer Green Aycock, 52; wife Janie, 48; and children Robert, 30, Lary, 18, and Peter, 13; plus mother Faine Aycock, 81.

  • Jim Baker

In the 1910 census of Lafayette township, Lonoke County: on England Road, farmer James Baker, 26, wife Mae E., 23, and children Bertha, 3, and Annie, 7 months.

  • Clayton Barnes

In the 1910 census of Lafayette township, Lonoke County, Arkansas: farmer Clayton Barnes, 24; wife Jennie, 25; step-daughters Lizzie Phillips, 12, and Carrie Phillips, 8; plus sister-in-law Lucelia Jones, 18. The adults were born in North Carolina; the children in Arkansas.

  • Richard Barnes

In the 1930 census of Little Rock, Pulaski County, Arkansas: at 1515 Bishop Street, owned and valued at $3000, Richard B. Barnes, 40, an office building porter, and wife Hazel Barnes, 30.

  • James Columbus Bynum

In the 1880 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: laborer Larence Bynum, 24; wife Edney, 19; children James, 1, and Mary J., 1 month; mother-in-law Liddie Bynum, 55; brother Isac Bynum, 22; and sister-in-law Anna Bynum, 17.

In the 1930 census of Well township, Lonoke County, Arkansas: farmer J.C. Bynum, 51; wife Florence, 50; daughter Odessa, 12, and adopted son Columbus Webb, 5. J.C. and Florence were born in North Carolina; the children in Arkansas.

  • Charley Augusta Bynum

In the 1880 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County, see James C. Bynum above.

In the 1900 census of Richwoods, Lonoke County, Arkansas: Laurance Bynum, 55; wife Edna, 39; children Mary, 19, Charlie, 17, Hattie, 16, Rachel, 9, Lewis, 6, Cora, 3, and Laurance, 11 months; grandsons Mack and Romie Notsie, both 1 week; and son-in-law Ed Notsie, 25. The Children after Rachel were born in Arkansas.

  • Josh Griffin

In the 1910 census of Little Rock, Pulaski County, Arkansas: at East 11th Street, Josh Griffin, 28, public works laborer; wife Lizzie, 30; and stepson Willie Sanders, 6.

  • Tom Hooks

In the 1920 census of Barraque township, Jefferson County, Arkansas: on Little Rock Road, farmer Thomas Hooks, 43; wife Lula, 44; and children Thomas, 16, Nathan, 14, Carolina, 14, Corena, 10, Nora B., 7, Wilber, 6, Vandie, 4, and Fredona, 1. All the children were born in Arkansas.

  • Andrew Jackson Jones

  • George Daniel Jones

In the 1900 census of Williams township, Lonoke County, Arkansas: Virginia-born farmer Peter Jones, 50; wife Ellen, 44; and son George, 20, both born in North Carolina.

  • Robert Daniel Parker

Perhaps, in the 1900 census of Lafayette township, Lonoke County, Arkansas: farmer Ceaza Parker, 39; wife Cinda, 42; and children Mattie, 16, Willis, 14, Daniel, 12, Luvenia, 8, Huburt, 7, Piety, 4, and Mary A., 1.

Where did they go?: Out-of-state World War II draft registrations, no. 1.

Elton Henry Thomas was the son of Charles Thomas and Sarah Best Thomas. He returned to North Carolina; he died in Goldsboro in 1970.

  • Clarence Charles Dawson

Clarence Charles Dawson was the son of Clarence C. Dawson (see below) and Elizabeth Thomas Dawson.

  • Clarence Connor Dawson

Clarence Connor Dawson was the son of Alexander D. Dawson and Lucy Hill Dawson.

  • Leroy Armstrong

  • Walter Armstrong

  • Van Armstrong

Van Armstrong was the son of Guston and Drucilla Armstrong of Toisnot township, Wilson County. He first appears in the federal census of Petersburg, Virginia, in 1930.

Charles S. Alston was the son of James H. and Martha Dew Alston of Wilson township, Wilson County. On 3 November 1920, Charles S. Alston, 24, married Lessie Barbrey, 22, daughter of Hulis and Lola Barbrey, in Elm City. A.M.E. Zion minister B.P. Coward performed the ceremony in the presence of James O. Bunn, William H. Woods and Charles S. Thomas, all of Wilson.

  • David Alston

David Daniel Alston was the son of Henry and Mary Taylor Alston. He died 8 November 1974 in Norfolk, Virginia.

  • James Henry Adams

U.S. WWII Draft Cards Young Men, 1940-1947, [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com.

The greatest generation, pt. 3.

Each year the Wilson Daily Times publishes an advertising supplement that honors local veterans on Veterans Day. The insert features photographs submitted to the paper by its readership. This post is the third highlighting African-American soldiers and sailors included in the supplement.

  • Nathaniel Jones, Army, World War II

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  • Roma Jones, S.Sgt., Army, World War II

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  • Eddie L. Joyner, Army, World War I

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  • James Calvin Lewis, Army, 1944-46

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  • James Reid, Army, 1942-46

  • Aaron Swinson, Army, 1943

  • William R. White, Sgt., Army, 1941-45

  • Arthur Winstead, Army, World War II

  • Jacelle Winstead, Corp., Army, World War II

U.S. WWII Draft Cards Young Men, 1940-1947, [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com.

The greatest generation, pt. 2.

Each year the Wilson Daily Times publishes an advertising supplement that honors local veterans on Veterans Day. The insert features photographs submitted to the paper by its readership. This post is the second highlighting African-American soldiers and sailors included in the supplement.

  • Lossie Batts, Corp., Army, 1945-46

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  • Colonious Junius Best, Army, World War II

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  • Roosevelt W. Best, Army, 1941-44

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  • Charles W. Christian, Sgt., Navy, 1940-44

Charles Wesley Christian’s wife Ada Odelle Harris Christian (1913-1992) was a Wilson native.

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  • Louis Hall Sr., Army Air Corps, 1945-47

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  • Joseph Harris, PFC, Army, 1946

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  • William H. Harris, FPC, Army, 1943-46

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  • Damp Haskins Jr., Army, 1945-47

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1200 Wainright Street, Coca-Cola plant laborer Damp Haskins, 24; wife Susie B., 21; son Damp Jr., 2, and daughter Hellen, 6 months; mother Hester, 72; brother Joseph, 18; Martha Pitt, 52; and nephew Jim Haskins, 10.

  • Willis Edward Hyman, Navy, World War II

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  • Johnnie A. Lucas, T-5, Army, World War II

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  • Reuben O’Neal Sr., Steward Mate, Navy, 1944-46

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U.S. World War II Draft Registration Cards, database on-line, http://www.ancestry.com.

The greatest generation, pt. 1.

Each year the Wilson Daily Times publishes an advertising supplement that honors local veterans on Veterans Day. The insert features photographs submitted to the paper by its readership. This post is the first of several highlighting African-American soldiers and sailors included in the supplement.

  • Paul Garfield Arrington, Army, World War II

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  • George E. Atkinson, PFC, Army, 1941-1945

  • Willie M. Atkinson, PFC, Army, 1945-46

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  • Curley Bagley, Army, 1942-46

In the 1910 census of Old Fields township, Wilson County: Lenora Bagley, 55; daughter Etta, 27; and her children Earnest, 16, Perry, 11, Presley, 6, Ida V., 3, and Curley, 1.

In the 1920 census of Old Fields township, Wilson County: Etta Bagley, 35, and children Ida W., 13, Curlie, 11, William H., 9, Cornelia, 6, and James R., 3.

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  • Earnest Barnes, PFC, Army, 1942-45

At least three men named Earnest or Ernest Barnes registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County.

  • Matthew Lee Barnes, S.Sgt., Army, 1942-46

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  • Robert Barnes, T4, Army, 1946-47

Several men named Robert Barnes registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County.

U.S. World War II Draft Registration Cards, database on-line, http://www.ancestry.com.

Herbert Reid, Harvard Law, Class of ’45.

More on Herbert O. Reid, Wilson-born scholar and civil rights attorney.

HERBERT O. REID

IN THE FIELD of constitutional law and in the protection of civil rights, Herbert O. Reid, who died on Friday at the age of 75, stood out. Because of Dr. Reid, a brilliant professor and former acting dean of the Howard University Law School, thousands of men and women across the country share a common vision of the majesty of the Constitution and the workability of America.

Except for his first year as a Howard Law School professor in 1947, when he said he learned more from his students than he taught them, Herb Reid had a major hand in producing a host of this country’s most distinguished lawyers, public officials and judges. Many served with him during the decades of the 1950s and 1960s as legal guardians of the civil rights movement. But unlike many legal scholars, Dr. Reid was as comfortable in the courtroom and in the backroom of politics as he was in the classroom. Everywhere he landed, he became a pivotal figure. He took on the exclusion of New York Rep. Adam Clayton Powell from the House of Representatives in 1967 and won a U.S. Supreme Court victory two years later. School segregation in America fell before him and a handful of lawyers from the Howard Law School faculty and the NAACP who participated in the landmark 1954 Brown v. Board of Education and the companion desegregation cases for the District of Columbia. They carried the day in court, in part, because of the preparation and the dry runs that took place under Herb Reid’s drilling in the basement of the law school.

Dr. Reid was always on call for rescue operations. Sixteen years ago, when the board of education was mired down in the firing of yet another school superintendent, it was he who took on the excruciatingly difficult role of hearing officer and, with a degree of incisiveness and dignity, helped end that long ordeal for the city. It was that sense of duty to the city and his friends from the movement that led Dr. Reid to serve as former mayor Marion Barry’s personal counsel and then as a member of that administration. Without Herb Reid’s being there, friends say, it could have been even worse.

A graduate of Harvard law school himself, Dr. Reid frequently spoke lovingly and longingly about the “golden age” of the Howard Law School — the period in the 1940s and early 1950s, when distinguished faculty worked with students and other lawyers on the major civil rights issues of the time. Herbert Reid was a central part of it all.

Washington Post, 17 June 1991.

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On 16 October 1940, Reid registered for the World War II draft at the Harvard University precinct in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

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New York Age, 8 December 1945.

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New York Age, 12 July 1947.

U.S. WWII Draft Cards Young Men, 1940-1947, [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com.

Men ordered to report, no. 4.

On 30 March 1918, the Wilson County Draft Board inducted these 24 African-American men into military service and ordered them sent to Camp Grant, Illinois, for basic training.

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  • Will McNeill registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 1895 near Denver, Colorado; resided on Sugg Street, Wilson; was a laborer for R.G. Lassiter & Company, Wilson; and was single. He was of medium height and slender, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Zion Powell registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 4 April 1889 in Newport News, Virginia; resided in Wilson; was a laborer for Jake Matthews, Wilson; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Alexander B. Joyner registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 5 June 1896, Wilson; resided at 616 Viola Street, Wilson; was a chair pusher (?) for Shill Company, Atlantic City; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘A.B. Joyner.’
  • Willis Hackaday
  • Samies Simpson registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 11 May 1896 in Rocky Point, North Carolina; resided at 525 Bank Street, Wilson; was a laborer for W.T. Russel Box Company, Wilson; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘Samie Simpson.’
  • Abert Robert Lee Bullock registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 19 February 1895 in Wilson; resided at 410 North Pine Street, Wilson; was a cook at the New Briggs Hotel in Wilson; and was single. He was short and medium build, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘Abert Robert Lee Bullock.’
  • Columbus Stewart registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 25 December 1895 in Feuquay Springs, North Carolina; resided in Wilson; was a convict in Wilson County; and was married. He was of medium height and weight, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘Columbus Stewart.’
  • Waverly Murfey registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 1896 in Mount Olive, North Carolina; resided in Wilson; was a prisoner on Wayne County Public Roads; and was single. He was tall and of medium build, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Solister Coleman registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 30 April 1894 in Nichols, South Carolina; resided at 517 East Nash Street, Wilson; worked as an express laborer for Saw[?] Express, Wilson; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘Solister Coleman.’
  • Two African-American men named Will Barnes registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per their registration cards, the first was born 6 January 1890 in Wilson County; resided on East Street, Wilson; was a cook for C.E. Artis in Wilson; and was single. He was tall and of medium weight, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘Will Barnes.’ The second was born 13 August 1892 in Wilson; resided at 310 Kenan Street, Wilson; was a laborer for John Dew, Wilson; was married with a child. He was tall and of medium weight, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his name with an X.
  • Raston Williams
  • George Hawkins registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born on an unspecified date in Wilson County; resided in Wilson, care of Wiley Corbett; was a stable boy for Ed Dillard, Wilson; and was single. He was tall and stout, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Ernest Hines registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born on 24 December 1895 in Elm City; resided in Elm City; was a farm laborer for Geo. Gaston in Elm City; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X. The card carried this notation: “Registered by order of U.S. Marshal.”
  • Five African-American men named Henry Williams registered for the draft in Wilson County. This is most likely the Henry Williams born 1 January 1895 in Lynchburg, Virginia. Per his registration card, he resided in Wilson; worked on the roads of Wilson County; and was single. He was short and slender, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Floyd Pender registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 14 March 1896 in Wilson County; resided in Wilson; was a bootblack for Tate & Hines in Wilson; and was single. He was short and medium weight, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘Floyd Pender.’
  • Stacey Edwards
  • Three African-American men named John Artis registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. This was most likely either John Ed Artis born 31 March 1889 in Stantonsburg or John Artis born 16 March 1894 in Wilson County. Per his registration card, the elder John Artis worked as a farmer for E.B. Graves of Wilson; was married with four children; medium height and weight, with dark eyes and hair. He signed his card with the X. The younger John Artis resided on East Green Street, Wilson; was a porter at Hotel Briggs, Wilson; and was single. He was short and of medium weight, with black eyes and hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Lonnie Jackson registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 12 September 1895 in Beaufort County, North Carolina; resided at 217 Railroad Street, Wilson; was a laborer for Wilson Cotton Mill; and was single. He was short and of medium weight, with brown eyes and black hair. Notation: “Hand has been injured.” He signed his card with an X.
  • Burley Brooks registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 7 April 1896 in Greene County, North Carolina; resided at 615 Robinson Street, Wilson; worked repairing machinery for C.H. Darden in Wilson; and was single. He was tall and stout, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘Burly Brooks.’
  • Earnest Chester Byrd registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 17 March 1896 in Harnett County, Nirth Carolina; resided at 404 Goldsboro Street, Wilson; was a butler for Mrs. Ed. Woodard, Wilson; and was single. He was tall and of medium weight, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘Earnest C. Byrd.’
  • Strat Barnes registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 1895 in resided in Wilson; was a laborer for R.G. Lassiter & Company, Wilson; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Amos Brooks registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 1896 in Black Creek; resided in Wilson; was a farm laborer for P.S. Horne, Black Creek township; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with black eyes and hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Plummer Williams registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 1896 in Pitt County, North Carolina; resided on R.F.D. 6, Wilson; was a farming hand for W.F. Woodard, Wilson; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with dark eyes and hair. He signed his card with an X.

U.S. Lists of Men Ordered to Report to Local Board for Military Duty, 1917-1918, [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com; U.S. World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com.

Men ordered to report, no. 3.

On 30 March 1918, the Wilson County Draft Board inducted these 25 African-American men into military service and ordered them sent to Camp Grant, Illinois, for basic training.

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  • Charlie Harris
  • Jimmie Pender registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in December 1888 in Georgia, resided on a rural free delivery route outside Wilson, worked as a railway laborer for Norfolk Southern Railway Company, and had a wife and child. He was of medium height and stout, with black eyes and hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Willie Donald
  • Arthur Darring
  • Paul A. Kelly
  • William Gaston registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 1896 in Elm City, resided in Elm City, farmed for P.C. Cobb near Elm City, and was married. He was tall and slender, with dark blue(?) eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • David Barnes
  • Charlie Rice registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 25 June 1886 in Danville, Virginia; resided at 522 East Nash Street, Wilson; was a laborer for W.T. Clarke in Wilson; and was single. He was tall and slender, with black eyes and hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Julius Franklin Freeman registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 9 December 1887 in Wilson; resided on Nash Road, R.F.D. #4, Wilson; worked as a brickmason for H.T. Crittenden in Wilson; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘Julius F. Freeman.’
  • Will Dixon registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 1896 in Farmville, North Carolina; resided in Stantonsburg; was a laborer at W.L. Russell Box Company; and was single. He was short and of medium weight, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Luther Williams registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in6 June 1890 in Wilson County; resided in Walstonsburg; was a laborer on H.H. Walston Jr.’s farm; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with dark brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Eddie Dew registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in May 1896 in Wilson County; resided at 617 Darden, Wilson; was a laborer for John B. Deans, Wilson; and was single. He was slender, with dark eyes and hair. He signed his card ‘Eddie Dew.’
  • Mancie Gaston registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 10 June 1892 in Elm City, resided in Elm City, worked as a barber for G.A. Gaston in Elm City, and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with dark brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘Mancie Gaston.’
  • Moses Parker registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 31 August 1889 in Nash County; resided at 305 Barnes Street, Wilson; was a hack driver for Crockett & Aikens, a stable on Barnes Street; and was single. He was tall and of medium build, with dark eyes and hair. He signed his card ‘Moses Parker.’
  • Alonzo Coley registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 8 September 1890 in Pikeville, Wayne County; resided at 105 East Street, Wilson;    worked as a carpenter for Barney Reid “in the Town of Wilson”; and was single. He was tall and of medium build, with dark eyes and hair. He signed his card ‘Alonzo Coley.’
  • Dave McPhail registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in April 1896 in Wade [sic, Wayne? Wake?] County; resided in Darden’s Alley, Wilson; worked as an auto driver for S.H. Vick in Wilson; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with black eyes and hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Augustus Gaston registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 28 March 1894 in Elm City, resided in Elm City, worked as a barber for G.A. Gaston in Elm City, and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with dark brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘Augustus Gaston.’
  • Ernest Moore registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in August 1894 in Greenville, North Carolina; resided at 517 Nash Street, Wilson; worked as a laborer for C.E. Moore in Wilson; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with black eyes and black hair, and had rheumatism. He signed his card with an X.
  • Hayes Boatman registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 23 August 1896 in Raeford, North Carolina; resided on Hines Street, Wilson; was a box factory employee for W.J. Russell Box Company, Wilson; and was single. He was of medium height and slender, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • Julius Rountree registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 4 March 1895 in Greenville, North Carolina; resided in Wilson; worked as a mechanic for Samuel Vick in Wilson; and had a wife and child. He was tall and of medium build, with brown eyes and dark hair. He signed his card ‘Julius Rountree.’
  • Roscoe Williams registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 28 December 1895 in Wilson; resided on Vance Street, Wilson; was an unemployed laborer; and was single. He was tall and of medium build, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘Roscoe Williams.’
  • Orlando Farmer registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 5 November 1886 in Wilson; resided at 643 Nash Street, Wilson; was a drayman for Boykin Grocery Company, Wilson; and was single. He was tall and stout, with brown eyes and black hair. He signed his card ‘Olander Farmer.’
  • John Tyler registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 26 March 1895 in Charleston, West Virginia; resided in Darden’s Alley, Wilson; worked as a barber for Charlie Knight, Wilson; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with black eyes and black hair. He signed his card with an X.
  • John Hardy Ellis registered for the draft on 5 June 1917. Per his registration card, he was born in 10 January 1895 in Wilson County; resided in Stantonsburg; was a section hand for Norfolk Southern R.R. Company; and was single. He was of medium height and weight, with dark eyes and hair and had “one finger off on right hand.” He signed his card ‘John Hardy Elies.’

U.S. Lists of Men Ordered to Report to Local Board for Military Duty, 1917-1918, [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com; U.S. World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com.