enslaved people

Bill of sale for one negro boy named Wesley, 1858.

In February 1858, James H. Barnes registered a bill of sale signed by Alfred Boykin upon Barnes’ purchase of an enslaved man named Wesley. I have not been able to identify Wesley post-Emancipation. Barnes may have been the J.H. Barnes of Joyners and Gardners township in the 1860 slave schedule who reported owning 15 enslaved people, including four boys and men, aged 11, 15, 19 and 30, who may have been Wesley. [Based on his valuation, I am inclined to believe he was one of the younger two.] Alfred Boykin appears in the same schedule in Oldfields township owning five enslaved people.

Received of James H. Barnes Six Hundred and twenty dollars in full for one negro boy named Wesley. The right and title of Said negro I will forever warrant and defend also I warrant the Said negro to be young and Healthy January 12th 1858        /s/ Alfred Boykin, Wm. H. Bardin [witness]

The reverse of the receipt: The execution of the within Bill of Sale is proved before me by the oath & examination of W.H. Bardin the subscribing witness thereto. Let it be registered Jany. 29th 1858  /s/ T.C. Davis

Registered foregoing Bill of sale Feb 16th 1858.   R.J. Taylor Regr.

Bill of Sale, Miscellaneous Records, Wilson County Records, North Carolina State Archives.

Rufus Edmundson plantation.

The Rufus Edmundson House lies just two blocks off Stantonsburg’s main street, but at the very edge of town. Behind it stretch miles of fields and woodland.

“This antebellum house was built circa 1846 for Rufus Edmundson. … The house is similar to the William Barnes and Ward-Applewhite-Thompson Houses (both in Stantonsburg Township) and the Elias Barnes house (Saratoga township). It stands two stories high and the main block is capped with a shallow hipped roof. Unusual heavy dentils ornament the frieze and the three-bay facade was once sheltered by a double-gallery porch supported by square columns. Although the door leading to the second floor porch has been altered, the original trabeated entrance to the first floor is still intact. A single-story, hipped-roof porch with Doric columns replaced the earlier double-gallery porch in the early twentieth century. On the interior the house is divided by a wide central hall with two rooms to either side. Some original woodwork remains intact including a handsomely curved newel post.”  — Kate Ohno, Wilson County’s Architectural Heritage (1981).

——

In the 1860 census of Saratoga township [which included Stantonsburg], Wilson County, Rufus Edmundson’s reported wealth comprised $15,000 in real property and $30,600 in personal property. The 1860 slave schedule parses Edmundson’s wealth — the $30,600  mostly took the form of 34 enslaved men, women and children, aged 1 through 38, who inhabited six dwellings on Edmundson’s farm and toiled for him.

The 1870 census was the first post-Emancipation enumeration. Next door to Rufus Edmundson were Margaret and Bailum Hall and their son John, 4 months. (Balaam Hall, son of James Woodard and Liza Hall, had married Margaret Edmundson, daughter of Proncey Edmundson, on 19 July 1870 in Wilson County.) Next to the Halls was a household comprised of members of several families, including Bertha Edmundson, 20, and Winnie, 12, and Gray Edmundson, 14, who were all listed as farmer’s apprentices. Though close proximity and shared surname, as well as indenture as apprenticed labor, do not guarantee that these young people had been enslaved by Rufus Edmundson, these facts are strong evidence.

A levy upon three enslaved persons, the property of George W. Barefoot.

State of North Carolina, Wilson County  }

Know all men by these presents that we A.J. Barefoot & J.D. Rountree are held & firmly bound  unto Elias Barnes in the sum of five hundred Dollars for which payment we bind ourselves, our heirs, executors & administrators jointly & severally Sealed with our seals & dated April 25th 1855. Whereas, the said Elias Barnes has placed in the hands of the said A.J. Barefoot negro slaves Mary, Cherry and Henry the property of Geo. W. Barefoot which were lately levied upon & taken by the said Elias, as Sheriff of Wilson County, by virtue of original attachments in favor of Jas. D. Barnes, and J.D. & M. Rountree to the use of Wm. Barnes Jr. against the said Geo.W. Barefoot, returnable to July Term 1855 of the Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions of said County.

Now the condition of the above obligation is such that should the said Barefoot produce the said negro slaves at the next Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions & be held for the County of Wilson at B.H. Bardens store in the Town of Wilson there to abide the decision & judgment of the Court then this obligation to be void otherwise to remain in full force & virtue.   /s/ A.J. Barefoot, J.D. Rountree

Court Cases Involving Slaves, Slave Records, Wilson County Records, North Carolina State Archives.

The house that Jack built.

STANTONSBURG — The house that Jack Sherrod built is a hidden history.

Built as a wood structure in 1886, the entire building has been encapsulated into brick and has had multiple additions over the years, but Leonard Paul Sherrod Jr., great-grandson of the builder, knows what’s underneath.

Sherrod and other family members are preparing for a grand reunion on Sept. 1-3 to be held at the Sherrod homestead.

“We are refurnishing, repairing, remodeling when necessary and getting it ready to be used as a venue for the upcoming September reunion,” said Sherrod, who was born in Wilson in 1933 and graduated from Charles H. Darden High School in 1952

A picnic and a banquet are planned at the event, which Sherrod has titled “Exploring Our Family History.”

“There is so much history,” Sherrod said. “Not only is it family history, it is African-American history, and in some small portion, American history.”

That history begins with Jack Sherrod and his wife, Cassie. Both had been slaves, yet 20 years afterward had managed to build a home on what is now Watery Branch Church Road south of Stantonsburg near the confluence of Wilson, Greene and Wayne counties.

“He had been a slave until the end of the war,” Sherrod said. “As a freed man, he acquired this land and built a home on it. He could not read, nor write, but he could build things. He had this God-given talent for building things. It is not written, but certainly said, that he built a lot of structures in this area. He was a builder. It took him two years to build this house.”

Last week, Sherrod stood in the graveyard behind Watery Branch Free Will Baptist Church. The graves of Jack and Cassie Sherrod are right there, with those of other deceased family members, about 200 yards away from and within sight of the homestead.

“To be able to stand there in your yard and see where your great-grandparents are buried, that raises a lot of emotions within me,” Sherrod said. The house that he built and I can see his grave from the front yard.”

Restoring the homestead is a passion for Sherrod.

“I think the Lord put this in my spirit to be a part of preserving this property because it has been in the family for so long and it is such a rich history that I could not stand by and let it go,” he said.

From “Hidden History: Family Celebrates Home of Patriarch, a Former Slave,” by Drew C. Wilson, Wilson Times, 16 July 2017.

——

Jack Sherard, son of Denis Barnes and Tempy Davis, and Cassy Exum received a marriage license in Wayne County in 1868.

In the 1870 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: Jack Sherard, 26, wife Cassey, 25, and daughter Fanny, 4.

In the 1880 census of Nahunta, Wayne County: farmer Jack Sherod, 37; wife Cassey, 28; and children Fanny, 12, William, 9, Ida, 7, Marcy, 2, John, 5, and Benny, 11 months.

In the 1900 census of Nahunta township, Wayne County: farmer Jack Sherard, 56; wife Cassy; and children Ida, 27, Benjamin, 25, Dalas, 20, Exum, 16, Arthur, 15, and Cora, 11.

Ida Sherrod, 32, and Alonzo Wilson, 35, received a marriage license in Wayne County on 18 April 1906.

On 17 April 1907, Cora Sherrod, 18, of Wayne County, daughter of Jack Sherrod, married Columbus Ward, 26, of Greene County, son of Pearson and Cherry Ward. Oscar Hagans applied for the license, and Methodist minister Robert E. Hunt performed the ceremony in Stantonsburg, Wilson County, in the presence of Mrs. R.E. Hunt, B.J. Thompson, and Mrs. B.J. Thompson.

On 13 January 1909, Arthur D. Sherard, 22, son of Jack and Cassie Sherard, married Effie Diggs, 18, daughter of Margaret Diggs at Frances Diggs‘ house in Nahunta township, Wayne County. Jack Sherard applied for the license, and witnesses to the ceremony were W.M. Artis, Henry Pender and Richard Artis, all of Eureka, Nahunta township.

In the 1910 census of Nahunta township, Wayne County: farmer Jack Sherard, 66; wife Kassey, 55; and grandchildren Thomas, 8, and Zelma Sherard, 5.

Dallas Alonzo Sherrod, 28, son of Jack and Carrie Sherrod, married Mary Ann Taylor, 20, daughter of Nelson and Delia Taylor, on 21 December 1911 in Petersburg, Virginia.

Dallas A. Sherrod

Dallas A. Sherrod.

Jack Sherrod scrawled an X at the bottom of his last will and testament on 30 June 1914. By its terms, his wife Cassie was to receive a life estate in all his property and, after her death, daughters Cora Ward and Fannie Powell (wife of George Powell) would receive dollars each, with the remainder of his property equally divided among his children John Sherard, Exum Sherard, Willie Sherard, Ben Sherard, Arthur Sherard, Ida Wilson and Dallas Sherard.

Jack Sherrod died 18 May 1915 in Nahunta township, Wayne County. Per his death certificate, he was born 4 August 1842 to Dennis Barnes and Tempie Barnes; was married; and worked as a farmer. Arthur Sherrod was informant.

Ida B. Wilson died 21 October 1918 in Nahunta, Wayne County, of influenza. Per her death certificate, she was the widow of Alonza Wilson; was born about 1873 in Wayne County to Jack Sherrod and Cassie Exum. Informant was Ben Sherrod of Fremont, North Carolina.

In the 1920 census of Nahunta township, Wayne County: on Stantonsburg Road, Cassey Sherard, 69; and grandchildren Zelma, 15, Joseph, 12, and Ralph L., 12.

On 30 November 1926, Cora Sherrod, 35, of Stantonsburg, daughter of Jack and Cassie Sherrod, married Robert C. Powell, 58, of Stantonsburg, son of Lawson and Lanie Powell, in Stantonsburg, Wilson County. A.M.E. Zion minister E.D. Lewis performed the ceremony in the presence of Albert A. Cooke of Raleigh, North Carolina, and Mattie Winstead of Stantonsburg.

In the 1930 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: on Delaware Line (on street), Cassie Sherrod, 75, widow; granddaughters Zelma, 25, Doris, 7, and Jeraldine, 6; and daughter Cora Powell, 30, teacher. Sherrod owned the house, valued at $600.

Dallas Sherrod died 26 December 1934 in Petersburg, Dinwiddie County, Virginia. Per his death certificate, he was 50 years old; was born in Stantonsburg, North Carolina, to Jack and Cassie Sherrod; was married to Mary Sherrod; and resided at 1111 Stainback Street. He was buried in East View cemetery.

Cassie Sherrod died 26 June 1940 at 624 East Green Street, Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was the widow of Jack Sherrod; was born in Wayne County to Lewis Hall and Cassie Kelley. Informant was Cora S. Powell, 612 East Green.

Cassie Sherod’s will entered probate on 1 July 1940. Dated 25 November 1932(?), per its terms sons Exum, Arthur, Dallas and Ben Sherod were to receive $1 each; wearing clothes to daughter Fannie Sherod Powell; $1 each to John Sherod’s children Bee and Joe; $1 each to John Sherod’s children Velma and Tom; and a house and lot in Stantonsburg, a piano and all other personal property to Raphael Ward.

Arthur Sherrod died 28 March 1955 in Nahunta township, Wayne County. Per his death certificate, he was born 14 March 1886 in Wayne County to Jack Sherrod and Catherine Exum and was married to Effie Sherrod.

Cora Sherrod Barnes died 12 June 1972 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 13 December 1888 to Jack and Cassie Sherrod; resided at 500 East Green Street; was a retired teacher. Informant was Ralph Sherrod, 327 West 30th Street, New York City.

Photograph of D. Sherrod courtesy of Ancestry user garey45sos1.

“Standing by your old ni**er, are you?”

b Woodard 1 31 1908

News & Observer (Raleigh), 31 January 1908.

This nasty bit of “news” is a sample of the gratuitous racism that permeated Josephus DanielsNews & Observer in the Jim Crow era. Daniels had grown up in and gotten his journalistic start in Wilson and undoubtedly knew all the involved parties well.

Benjamin Woodard, a notorious folk doctor in Wilson County, had been arrested on unclear charges (probably involving bootlegging liquor) and hauled into federal court in Raleigh. Several notable white Wilsonians showed up to serve as counsel and character witnesses, including brothers and law partners Frederick A. Woodard (a former United States Congressman) and Sidney A. Woodard (a state congressman). The Woodards were described as Ben Woodard’s former owners, though F.A. had been a child and S.A. an infant at war’s end. Ben’s owner, then, had been their father, Dr. Stephen Woodard of Black Creek, Wilson County. F.A. requested a nolle prosequi (“nol. pros.”), which is odd, as this is generally a motion made by a prosecutor who wishes to drop charges. The District Attorney here politely indicated his unwillingness to make such a request, but the judge cheerfully entered it anyway. Thus Dr. Ben benefitted from ties forged in slavery and earned an insulting article in the state’s newspaper of record.

The estate of Ann Williamson.

Documents in the 1822 estate files of Ann Williamson of Nash (now Wilson) County include several references to the sale or “hier” of enslaved people. Williamson was the widow of Joseph Williamson, and Bartley Deans was her executor.

Williamson had executed a will in 1807, fifteen years before her death. She listed three enslaved people — women named Pat and Rachel and a boy named Arch.

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A partial inventory in Williamson’s estate records also lists Arch, Rachel and Pat. Rachel and Pat are listed together at one place in documents and may have been mother and daughter. (Note that, as she was only ten years old in 1822, the Pat in in Williamson’s estate could not have been the Pat in her will.)

ann-w-12-1821-inventory

Here, record of the sale of “Negro gal Pat” to Eatman Flowers for $353.88; the hire of Arch, first to Jesse Sillivant, then to Thomas Williamson; and the hire of Rachel to Ford Taylor. These three were hired out repeatedly.

ann-w

A receipt for partial proceeds from the sale of Jack to John Watson, executor of Luke Collins:

ann-w-2

Estate of Ann Williamson (1822), North Carolina Wills and Estates, 1665-1998 [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com.

 

 

First-generation freedom, pt. 6.

The sixth in a series of annotated abstracts of Wilson County death certificates of African-Americans born before 1870, the cusp of slavery and freedom. The records are a trove of information about otherwise obscure family relationships among enslaved and free people of color and shed light on intra- and interstate migration patterns in the decades after Emancipation.

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Barnes, Della. Born 1841, Wilson County. Died 29 March 1931, Wilson township. Father, F.K. Moore, Wilson County. Mother, Sarah Moore, Wilson County. Married to Drew Barnes. Common laborer. Resided 501 Murray Street, Wilson. Informant, Bessie Barnes. 

Barnes, Dina B. Born 1849, Wilson County. Died 4 February 1944, Lucama. Father, Simon Dew, Wilson County. Mother, Litha Horne, Wilson County. Widow of Blount Barnes. Farmhand. Buried at Beckie Pate. Informant, Bessie Lee Dew. [In the 1880 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: Simon Due, 45, wife Litha, 40, and children Laney, 16, Peter, 15, Lucy, 11, Hilliard, 7, Izaih, 9, Arch, 3, Deanah, 10, Hester, 3, Patience, 4 months, and Zilpha Due, 3, and William Horn, 5 months.]

Barnes, Dollie Ann. Born 1856, Nash County. Died 13 January 1929, Wilson. Father, Jacop Boddie, Nash County. Mother, not listed. Married to Lemon Barnes. Tenant farmer for E.K. Wright. Informant, Leona Barnes.

Barnes, Dollie Ann. Born 1861, Wilson County. Died 19 January 1928, Crossroads township. Father, Edmond Williamson, Wilson County. Mother, Bethune Williamson, Wilson County. Married to Matherson Barnes. Common laborer. Buried in Williamson cemetery. Informant, Timothy Seaberry. [In the 1880 census of Crossroads township, Wilson County: Edmund Williamson, 50, wife Thany, 44, and children William, 25, Nicie, 23, Eliza, 22, Eddie, 22, Ally, 19, Pollina, 17, Dolly Ann, 15, Isacc, 12, and Raiford, 7.]

Barnes, Dred. Born 1860, Wilson County. Died 29 September 1930, Black Creek township. Father, Nelson Barnes, Wilson County. Mother, Annie Daniel, Wilson County. Farmer. Married to Lusina Barnes. Informant, Lusina Barnes. [In the 1870 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: Nelson Barnes, 35, wife Ansey, 36, and children Harriet, 15, Margaret, 12, Dread, 10, Mae, 8, Thomas, 7, and Lon, 2 months.]

Barnes, Ed. Born 1869, North Carolina. Died 5 December 1916, Wilson. Father, George Barnes, North Carolina. Mother, not listed. Married. Brickmason. Buried in Wilson. Informant, Mary Turner.

Barnes, Ellen. Born 1851, Wilson County. Died 17 March 1936, Stantonsburg township. Father, Bill Barnes, Wilson County. Mother, Harriett Barnes, Wilson County. Widow. Resided in Stantonsburg township. Informant, Rev. Wiley Barnes.

Barnes, Fannie. Born 1850, Johnston County. Died 21 August 1918, Wilson. Father, Chas. Barnes, North Carolina. Mother, Nicy Watson, North Carolina. Widow. Resided at Branch farm. Tenant farmer. Buried in Wilson. Informant, Joseph Taylor.

Barnes, Frances. Born 1860, Wilson County. Died 30 May 1938, Wilson. Father, Morrison Woodard, Wilson County. Mother, Martha Thorn, Wilson County. Married to Short W. Barnes. Informant, Maggie Crawford. [In the 1870 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: carpenter Morison Woodard, 47; wife Martha, 32; and children Nancy, 18, Arche, 17, and Cherry, 15, all farm laborers, Rosa, 13, Frances, 8, Jane, 7, John, 4, Martha, 1, and Mary, 2 months.]

Barnes, Frank. Born 1845, Wilson County. Died 29 July 1919, Wilson township. Father, Harry Barnes, North Carolina. Mother, Nellie Barnes, North Carolina. Married. Farmer. Buried Wilson County. Informant, Austin Barnes.

Barnes, Gatsey. Born 1833, Wilson County. Died 4 July 1931, Stantonsburg township. Father, Spencer Roundtree, Wilson County. Mother, Venus Roundtree, Wilson County. Widow. Buried Barnes graveyard.

Barnes, George. Born 12 November 1949, Wilson County. Father  Roundtree, Wilson County. Mother, Annie Barnes, Wilson County. Married to Sylvesta Barnes, Day laborer. Resided Manchester Street, Wilson. Buried in Elm City. Informant, Frank Barnes.

Barnes, George. Born 1835, Wilson County. Died 22 November 1933, Wilson. Father, not listed. Mother, Debra Woodard, Wilson County. Widower. Resided Wilson County Home. Informant, Mistry Woodard.

Barnes, George T. Born 1859, Wilson County. Died 12 April 1935, Wilson. Father, John Barnes, Wilson County. Mother, Della Farmer, Wilson County. Widower of Mary Barnes. ACL Railroad employee. Resided Viola Street, Wilson. Informant, John H. Barnes.

Barnes, George. Born 1855, North Carolina. Died 19 December 1910, Wilson. Father, not listed. Mother, Rosa Barnes, North Carolina. Widower. Laborer. Informant, Tib Barnes. [In the 1870 census of Town of Wilson, Wilson County: washer woman Rosa Barnes, 40; with children George, 13, farm laborer; Auther, 10, brickyard worker; Phebee, 8; and domestic servant Pricilla Joyner, 25.

A negro of the old school, treated and trained right.

wdt-8-20-1918

Wilson Times, 20 August 1918.

In the 1870 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: Redmond Barnes, 34, wife Martha, 29, and children Adeline, 7, Mary, 3, and Laura, 1; plus Alfred Simms, 29.

In the 1880 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: Redmon Barnes, 45; wife Martha, 38; children Adline, 19, Mary, 13, Laura, 11, Harriet, 9, James, 7, Margaret, 5, Joan, 4, Martha Ann, 2, and Edd, 1.

In the 1900 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: Redman Barnes, 65; wife Martha, 69; children Lou, 36, Eddie, 20, Wiley, 19, John, 17; and Kinney, 16, and Adline Ellis, 3.

In the 1910 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: Martha Barnes, 68; son Wiley Barnes, 29, daughter-in-law Annie Barnes, 19, and grandchildren Lula, 3, and unnamed, 1 month; son-in-law John A. Mayo, 48, daughter Hattie L., 39, and grandchildren John E., 8, and Joseph C., 5; and granddaughter Adeline Ellis, 13.

s123_84-2797

Freedom’s eldest.

The 1870 census of Wilson County, North Carolina, recorded 47 African-American men and women reportedly born in the 18th century. Nearly all had been enslaved and had spent 65 or more years in bondage. Forty-five reported having been born in North Carolina; two, in Virginia.

They were:

  • Archibald Artis, born 1800.

In Gardners township: Archebald Artis, 70, wife Rosa, 64, with Tamer, 23, and George Bynum, 25.

  • Harry and Rachel Atkinson, born 1788 and 1795.

In Gardners township: Rachel, 75, Harry, 82, and Isaac Atkinson, 60.

  • Hagar Atkinson, born 1795.

In Springhill township: Thomas Hinnant, 60, wife Hester, 40, and Mahala Hinnant, 4, with Hager Atkinson, 75.

  • Hannah Barnes, born 1786.

In Stantonsburg township: Toby Barnes, 56, and Hannah Barnes, 84.

  • Charles Barnes, born 1792.

In Black Creek township: Charles Barnes, 78, wife Chaney, 60, and Robert Barnes, 11.

  • Violet Barnes, born 1793.

In Stantonsburg township: Drawrey Barnes, 42, wife Violet, 35, and children Sylvia, 15, Sophia, 10, and Esther, 1; Della Edmondson, 24, and Susan, 1; and Violet Barnes, 77.

  • David Barnes, born 1796.

In Stantonsburg township: David Barnes, 74, and wife Venus, 54.

  • Archie Barnes, born 1797.

In Wilson township: Rosa Farmer, 35, with children Gray, 18, Turner, 17, Mary, 16, Thomas, 13, Daniel, 12, Leah, 10, Jefferson, 8, Louisa, 10 months, and Anna, 3, plus Arche Barnes, 73, who worked as a cooper.

  • Lucy Barnes, born 1800.

In Black Creek township: Lawyer Barnes, wife Lizzie, 28, and Lucy Farmer, 70.

  • Rhoda Beaufort, born 1800.

In Wilson township: Rich’d Beaufort, 54, Esther, 35, Rodah, 70, Richard, 14, and Spicey, 13.

  • Guilford Dew, born 1800.

In Black Creek township: Guilford Due, 70, Milbroy, 20, Amos, 22, Penny, 19, Amanda, 4 months, George, 4, William, 8, and James, 7.

In Wilson township: teamster Cally Speight, 23, Margaret, 26, and Ann Speight, 13; Abel Edwards, 84, Argen, 72, Issa, 20, Gracy, 23, and Ann P. Edwards, 5.

  • Hannah Ellis, born 1780.

In Saratoga township:  Jackson Ellis, 45, wife Margaret, 36, and children Hannah, 17, and Hewel, 11; Hannah Ellis, 90; and Lucy, 2, and Mary Simms, 1.

  • Virginia Everett, born 1794.

In Joyners township: Hardy, 55, and Selvia Farmer, 48, and Virginia Everett, 76.

  • Nancy Farmer, born 1799.

In Wilson township: Reuben Farmer, 68, Nancy, 71, and Luke Farmer, 11.

  • Dolly Fisher, born 1790.

In Stantonsburg township: Henry Newsom, 33, wife Fanny, 27, and children Caroline, 3, and Ellic, 1, and Dolly Fisher, 80.

  • Patsey Forbes, born 1800.

In Wilson township: Henry Forbes, 48, wife Louisa, 43, children Charles, 15, Georgiana, 9, and John, 21, plus Patsey Forbes, 70.

  • Abraham and Jonah Hines, born 1785 and 1800.

In Saratoga township: Abraham, 85, and wife Jonah Hines, 70.

In Springhill township: Benjamin Hoketts, 70, wife Clapsly, 60, and Haywood, 27, Daniel, 18, Cain, 16, and Sarah Hoketts, 16, plus Willie Nicholls, 8.

In Old Fields township: Willis Jones, 70, wife Sarah K., 61, and children Willis K., 23, Phaton A., 20, and Bethana, 18.

  • Cassa Jordan, born 1800.

In Wilson township: Squier Coleman, 47, wife Nancy, 36, and children Gray, 18, Mary, 16, Afonza, 9, Margaret, 4, and Thomas Coleman, 2; Cassa Jordan, 70, Riley Jordan, 7, and Thomas Jordan, 25.

  • Penelope Joyner, born 1786.

In Black Creek township: Cherry Barnes, 20, and Penelope Joyner, 84.

  • Martin Locust, born 1789.

In Old Fields township: Martin Locust, 81, in a household headed by white farmer Matthew Lamm, 28.

  • Mariah Locust, born 1798.

In Taylor township: Mariah Locust, 72.

In the Town of Wilson: Estha McGowan, 70, and Alice McGowan, 16.

  • Miles Pipkins, born 1790.

In Cross Roads township: Virginia-born Miles Pipkins, with Anna, 40, Samuel, 10, Richard, 8, and Cherry Pipkins, 6.

  • Judah Mercer, born 1780.

In Saratoga township: Jubiter Parkus, 25, wife Charlotte, 26, and children Nicy, 6, Lucy, 5, and Ida, 11 months, plus Virginia-born Judah Mercer, 90.

  • Leah Moye, born 1780.

In Stantonsburg township: James Moye, 51, wife Edith, 50, children Delsey, 18, Harriet, 16, George, 10, and Warren, 8, plus Learh Moye, 90.

  • Rachel Pitts, born 1790.

In Joyners township: Robert Pitts, 67, wife Violet, 50, children Nicey, 19, and Rinah, 14, plus Rachel Pitts, 80.

  • Caesar Pittman, born 1795.

In Gardners township: Cesar Pittman, 75, and wife Hester, 60.

  • Cherry Rogers, born 1790.

In Saratoga township: Watson Stanton, 65, wife Rosa, 53, children Richard, 15, Adeline, 13, Feribee, 8, and Louisa, 21; midwife Cherry Rogers, 80; and Hardy Barnes, 20.

  • George Rountree, born 1790.

In Taylor township: George Rountree, 70, wife Portice, 66, and children Rich’d, 23, Rose, 23, Sallie, 19, and Ellic, 4.

  • Trecy Scott, born 1790.

In Wilson township: Robert, 40, and Pennie Amerson, 55, with Trecy Scott, 80.

  • Isaac Simpson, born 1795.

In Old Fields township: Isaac Simson, 75.

  • Bryant Simms, born 1790.

In Stantonsburg township: Jeffrey Simms, 24, wife Caroline, 22, and an unnamed one month-old infant, plus Bryant Simms, 80.

  • Anaka Stevens, born 1800.

In Wilson township: Anaka Stevens, 70, and Louisa Stevens, 20.

  • America Taylor, born 1790.

In the Town of Wilson: Harriet, 35, Turner, 14, and William Battle, 53, America Taylor, 80, and Henry Epps, 10.

  • Liberty and Virginia Thomas.

In Gardners township: Liberty, 74, and Virginia Thomas, 72.

  • Abram Thorn, born 1780.

In Wilson township: Abram Thorn, 90, and wife Gilley, 67.

  • Sabra Ward, born 1800.

In Stantonsburg township: Gatlin Barnes, 31, wife Jane, 22, and children Henry, 4, and Bud, 1, Sabra Ward, 70, and Sarah Barnes, 34.

  • Dinah Whitley, born 1800.

In Stantonsburg township: Levi Barnes, 45, wife Olive, 50, and children Samuel, 19, Charles, 10, Rachel, 18, and Celia, 15; Adeline, 23, Dinah, 70, Dewry, 12, and Richard Whitley, 42.

  • London Woodard, born 1791.

In Gardners township: London Woodard, 79, wife Penelope, 59, and children Trecy, 20, Hardy, 19, Haywood, 18, William, 15, and Peninah, 13.

  • Cilla Woodard, born 1800.

In Stantonsburg township: in the household of white farmer James Woodard, Cilla Woodard, 70.