industrial accident

A tree fell on him.

Wilson Daily Times, 8 February 1944.

——

In the 1870 census of Cokey township, Edgecombe County: farm laborer Peyton Vick, 29; wife Ellen, 21; children Henry, 11, Riley, 9, Roxana, 3, and Isadora, 2; and Zady Mercer, 58.

In the 1880 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: farmer Peyton Vick, 24; wife Ellen, 24; and children Rily, 18, Roxie, 13, Isadora, 12, Lou C., 10, Defada, 8, Sablaska, 6, Investa, 4, and Invoida, 1.

On 27 October 1887, Jerry Parker, 21, of Wilson County, married Roxey Vick, 22, of Wilson County, at Paton Vick’s in Toisnot township.

In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: widow Roxy Parker, 24, and children Joseph, 14, Minnie, 13, Elenn, 12, Armena, 11, Mathew, 10, and Defatie, 2.

On 19 April 1903, Charlie Hines, 40, of Wilson township, son of Wesley and Ollie Hines, married Rox Anna Parker, 40, of Wilson township, daughter of Payton and Ellen Vick. Elder B.W. Tippett, a Free Will Baptist minister, performed the ceremony in the presence of Stephen Strickland, Wm. H. Tippett, and H.F. Boswell, all of Elm City.

In the 1916 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Parker Roxie A (c) h Harper’s la nr Herring av

Seab Parker registered for the World War I draft in 1918 in Nash County, North Carolina. Per his registration card, he was born in March 1884; lived on Route 2, Elm City; farmed for J.W. Wells; and his nearest relative was Clora Parker.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Lipscomb Road, widow Roxie Parker, 50, cook, and daughter Ellen, 21, farm laborer. Next door: William H. Knight, 22; wife Minnie, 24; brothers-in-law Cephus, 29, Menus, 22, and Mathew, 18; and lodgers Mary Saunders, 25, and her children Lebis, 10, and Lovie, 8.

In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Parker Roxie A (c) laundress h 731 Harper

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Parker Roxie A (c) laundress h 802 Viola

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 811 Viola, laundress Ellen Gay, 36; mother Roxanna Parker, 67; and nephew Matthew, 16.

In the 1940 census of Stoney Creek township, Nash County: in a prison camp, Sebe Parker, 65, residence Wilson County.

Charlie Seab Parker died 7 February 1944 in Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was 52 years old; was born in Wilson to Jerry Parker and Roxie Vick; worked as laborer for Evans Bros. Sawmill; and lived in Rocky Mount, Nash County.

News and Observer (Raleigh, N.C.), 19 April 1944.

Roxie Parker died 8 August 1949 at her home at 616 Viola Street, Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 6 April 1847 [likely, 20 years] in Edgecombe County to Hayden Vick and Ellen Jones and was a widow. Informant was Minus Parker.

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Wilson Daily Times, 30 August 1949.

Boiler explosion.

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“No Dr. Instantly killed and body badly mutilated, caused by explosion of boiler at pumping station.”

A fireman tends the fire for running of boilers, heating buildings, or powering steam engines. The job involves hard physical labor, including shoveling coal or wood into a boiler’s firebox, and is inherently dangerous.

I have been unable to locate additional information about Walter Brailey‘s life or death.

Struck on the head by an iron cog wheel.

d news 9 20 00

Wilson Daily News, 20 September 1900.

——

On 30 November 1892, Thos. Day, 24, parents living, but not listed, of the town of Wilson, married Julia Battle, 19, daughter of Lewis Battle, of the town of Wilson. Presbyterian minister L.J. Melton performed the ceremony at Lewis Battle’s house. J.J. Wilson and J.W. Rogers were witnesses.

In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: tobacco stemmer Thomas Day, 33; wife Julia, 27, laundry woman; and boarders James Parham, 25, teamster, and John H. Gregory, 19, and Donald Parker, 17, both tobacco stemmers.

A deplorable blunder.

Sampson Democrat 5 26 1921 blunder

Sampson Democrat, 26 May 1921.

Ninety-five years ago today, the Times reported on a double-tragedy that befell a Sampson County family. First, their oldest son suffered a horrifying death in a guano factory in Wilson. Then, because damage to his corpse made identifying the body difficult, undertaker Charles H. Darden released his body to the wrong family.

In the 1920 census of Turkey township, Sampson County: Ed Sikes, 55, and his children Edward, 18, Leonard, 14, Lilla, 12, and David, 9.

According to The American Fertilizer Handbook, volume 13 (1920), Contentnea Guano Factory was located on the A.C.L. and Norfolk Southern Rail Road in Wilson. Founded in 1907, the factory had the capacity to produce 20,000 tons of acid phosphates annually and 600 tons of bagged goods a day. P.L. Woodard was president of the company, and Graham Woodard was secretary and treasurer.