Barnes

Studio shots, no. 89: the Mobley family.

I posted the obituary of Jane Rountree Mobley here.

Her great-great-granddaughter, Carolyn Maye, has graciously shared these photographs of Jane Mobley’s descendants, many of whom moved into Edgecombe and Pitt Counties in the early years of the 20th century.

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Rhoda Mobley Barnes

In the 1880 census of Wilson, Wilson County: farm worker John Mobley, 35; wife Jane, 28; and children Rhoda, 9, Henrietta, 6, Jane, 5, Isaac, 4, and John H., 1.

On 13 January 1889, Ben Barnes, 42, of Wilson township, married Rhoda Mobley, 21, of Toisnot township, on F.A. Woodard’s plantation in Wilson township. Primitive Baptist minister Samuel Burston performed the ceremony in the presence of Harry Sharp, Dennis Bynum and Mike Barefoot.

Rhoda Barnes died 1 June 1951 in Macclesfield, Edgecombe County. Per her death certificate, she was born 1 October 1854 [actually, about 20 years later] in Wilson County to John Mobley and Jane [maiden name unknown]; was a widow; and was buried in Harrell cemetery near Crisp, North Carolina. Mattie Howard was informant.

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Benjamin Barnes

Ben Barnes died 19 April 1935 on Amanda Pitts’ farm in Edgecombe County. Per his death certificate, he was born 12 December 1835 in Wilson County to Isaac Barnes and Julia [maiden name not given]; was married to Rhoda Barnes; was buried at Harrell cemetery. Informant was Jessie Barnes.

Martha Lee Roberson Maye (1932-2014), daughter of Willie and Annie Barnes Roberson, at age 7 and shortly before her death.

Mattie Barnes Howard (1905-1977), daughter of Rhoda and Ben Barnes.

413 East Green Street.

The seventy-ninth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

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As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this house is: “ca. 1893; 1 story; Zachariah Barnes house; two-room house; aluminum-sided; Barnes was a porter.” The house was formerly numbered #414.

In the 1912 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Barnes Zachariah porter 414 E Green

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: office maid Mary Palmer, 50, and her children Beatrice, 23, private cook; James E., 18, drugstore delivery boy; Glayds, 14, private nurse; Mary L., 12, private nurse; Lonie, 9; and Robert L., 8.

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Palmer Mary (c) janitress h 413 E Green; Palmer Beatrice (c) domestic 413 E Green; and Palmer Edw (c) porter Turlington & Morrison h 413 E Green

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 413 East Green, rented at $15/month, Georgia-born household servant Isaac Butler, 44; wife Estelle, a household servant; and lodger Eleanor Deans, 38, also a household servant.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Russell Julia (c) cook h 413 E Green

In the 1947-48 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Lee John W (c; Irene) orderly Woodard-Herring Hosp h 413 E Green

On 16 September 1986, the Wilson Daily Times ran an obituary for Lula B. Collins, who had last lived at 413 East Green:

Frank Barnes, seaman.

Frank Barnes applied for a Seaman’s Protection Certificate in August 1917. American seamen carried the document as proof of citizenship in foreign ports. Per his application, Barnes was born 22 January 1895 in Wilson, North Carolina; was not literate; and had been employed since 1915 as a fireman on the S.S. Mauretania en route from New York to France.

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Per his description, Barnes was 5’3″, 125 pounds, with brown eyes and black hair and a scar over his right temple. He resided at 1 Doyers Street, New York. [Doyers is a tiny elbow of a lane off The Bowery in Chinatown, and #1 is now home to Tasty Hand-Pulled Noodles Inc.]

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Howard Adams, above, and William Smith and Fredrick Woods, below, gave affidavits to establish Barnes’ identification.

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The customs collector testified to Barnes’ citizenship.

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In December 1917, Frank Barnes himself attested that he was born in Wilson in 1894 and that his father Frank Barnes “(probably)” or “believes he was born in” the United States. Barnes had lived in Wilson until 1915 when he began to work in shipping. He had recently worked on three ships: the S.S. Orduna from 1 July to 19 July 1917; the S.S. Carmenia from 26 August to 11 September 1917; and the S.S. Anglo Saxon, 14 November to 14 December 1917.

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Barnes received his identification in December 1917 in Bordeaux, France.

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Detail of the certificate:

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Close-ups of Frank Barnes’ photographs:

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Another photo from Barnes’ 1918 application for a protection certificate:

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U.S. Applications for Seaman’s Protection Certificates, 1916-1940 [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com; original document at Application for Seaman’s Protection Certificates, 1916-1940, Records of the Bureau of Marine Inspection and Navigation, 1774-1982, Record Group 41, National Archives, Washington, D.C.

Who did religion show plainest in the face of?

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Wilson Daily Times, 24 March 1934.

Notes from Julius John Thorn’s tribute to Wade Barnes:

  • “Elder A.J. Moore’s wife, late of Whitakers, N.C., was his young mistress in the days of slavery”
  • “Ex-sheriff Ed Farmer’s father [Larry Dew Farmer], late of Wilson County, was his master.”
  • “He joined the church at London, Wilson Co., about 1890, and was baptized by Elder Peter Battle.”
  • He was a deacon.
  • He died 2 March 1934, aged 89.
  • Elder C.H. Hagans may have preached his funeral — Charles H. Hagans.
  • He was buried in the colored cemetery in Elm City.
  • He was a “good, useful and noble old colored Lamb of God.”

——

Per Some Black Families of Wilson County, North Carolina, a compilation of The Hugh B. Johnston Working Papers published in 1997 by Wilson County Genealogical Society, in notes on the family of Benjamin and Feriby Woodard Artis:

“5. Julia Ann ‘Juda’ Artis was born on April 25, 1865, and died on April 28, 1960. She first married Columbus ‘Lum’ Thompson and lived near Lucama. [Their children were twins Mary Jane and Martha J. Thompson, born 26 April 1886. Martha married Joe Barnes, son of Wilson ‘Wilse’ Barnes, and their son Frank Barnes was born 29 January, 1909. Martha died 15 April 1909.]

“Jude Artis married secondly Wade Barnes, son of Silas Barnes and wife Rosetta Farmer. He was born August 1, 1845, and died on March 2, 1934. (He had first married Adeline Bynum, by whom he had (1) Rev. John Albert Barnes (Methodist, died July 20, 1944) who married Sarah Staton, (2) Willie Barnes never married, and (3) Betsy Barnes married Ned Holland of Delaware.) The Wilson Daily Times of March 24, 1934, carried a “Memorial to Wade Barnes” written by John Julius Thorne. … Frank Barnes was born on December 4, 1888. Ned Barnes was born on March 15, 1890. On December 12, 1917, he married Sally Simms, daughter of Ben Rawls and Mary Knight Bullock. She was born on April 1, 1900, and was reared by Jim and Hattie Simms. In the 1970 they lived at the corner of Pender and Dixon Street in Elm City. During World War I he served with the 344th Labor Battalion in the European Theatre.”

——

In the 1870 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: Silas Barnes, 49; wife Rosa, 45; and children Feribee, 20, and Wade, 23.

In the 1880 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: Wade Barnes, 33; wife Adline, 25; and children John, 6, Willis, 3, and Varina, 1; plus grandmother Dury Simms, 60.

On 20 August 1892, Wade Barnes, 45, of Gardners, son of Silas and Rose Barnes, married Juda Thompson, 26, of Gardners, daughter of Ben and Feribe Artis. Missionary Baptist minister W.T.H. Woodward performed the ceremony in Wilson in the presence of [illegible] Townsend, Kate Perry and Louisa Williams.

In the 1900 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: Wade Barnes, 53; wife Julia Ann, 36; and children Betsy, 16, Martha, 15, and Ned, 9.

In the 1910 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: on Farmers Mill Pond Road, Wade Barnes, 69; wife Julie Ann, 47; children Ned, 19, and Betsy, 23, and grandson Frank, 1.

In the 1920 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: on Nashville Road, Waid Barnes, 75, and wife Julia, 56.

In the 1930 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: in a home owned and valued at $3000. farm laborer Wade Barnes, 83; wife Juliann, 65; Frank, 21; lodger Alevia Batts, 39, widowed servant; and sister-in-law Mary Westray, 50, divorced.

 

Corner Line Primitive Baptist.

Lois Artis Daniels generously shared several photographs of Corner Line Primitive Baptist Church, a congregation active for about 100 years near the town of Saratoga. Her great-great-grandmother Eva Ellis Edmundson Barnes was the first of many family members who belonged to Corner Line, and was married to its long-time pastor, Reverend Wiley Barnes. Daniels’ great-grandmother Ella Jane Edmundson Smith was also a member, as were her daughters Geneva Smith Anderson (Daniels’ grandmother) and Bessie Smith Barnes.

Corner-Line Primitive Baptist Church sign, 1989.

Exterior of Corner-Line Primitive Baptist Church, 2003.

Interior of Corner-Line Primitive Baptist, 1989.

This photo and write-up of Corner Line appear in Robert C. Bainbridge and Kate Ohno’s Wilson, North Carolina: Historic Buildings Inventory (1980).

“The parent institution of Corner Line Primitive Baptist Church was Bartee Church in Stantonsburg Township. In the early twentieth century Bartee Church was abandoned and Thomas and Victoria Felton gave the land and lumber for the construction of the church. The name of the church was inspired by its location at the junction of three separately owned parcels of land. The first pastor was Elder Sam Brystern, who served the church until his death in 1930. Wiley Barnes was the church’s second pastor, and his son, Tom Barnes, took charge of the church in 1964 and is the present pastor. The Barnes family has historically been active in church affairs and Ellen, grandmother of the present paster, was one of the first black members of the White Oak Primitive Baptist Church. The church building, like many other Wilson County country churches, is a one-room rectangular building with a gable roof. The gable end entrance consists of double five-panel doors and the six-over-six windows in the side and rear elevations are protected by board and batten shutters.”

——

On 20 December 1899, Rufus Edmundson, 24, son of Green Edmundson and Rancy Edmundson, married Eva Ellis, 25, daughter of Laura Hudson, at “Few In Number Church” in Township #8. [Township 8? Were they married in Edgecombe County? The license was issued in Wilson County.] Primitive Baptist minister N.T. Johnson performed the ceremony; Louis Hagins applied for the license.

In the 1900 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: farmer Rufus Edmundson, 28; wife Eva, 26; and children Robert, 2, and Alfred, 2 months.

In the 1910 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: on Ellis Road, farmer Rufus Edmonson, 33; wife Eva, 33; and children Ella J., 7, Hada, 6, Sadie, 4, and “son-in-law” [stepson] Robert, 13.

On 2 January 1918, Crum Smith, 19, of Saratoga, son of Ed and Annie Smith, married Ella Edmundson, 18, daughter of Rufus and Eva Edmundson, on J.B. Eason’s farm in Saratoga. Rufus Edmundson applied for the license, and Sam Bynum, Isaa Bynum and James Bynum witnessed.

In the 1920 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: farmer Rufus Edmonson, 45; wife Eva, 46; and children Robert, 20, Haden, 17, and Sadie, 15.

In the 1920 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: Crum Smith, 21, wife Ella, 19, and daughter Eva, 1.

In the 1930 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: Rufus Edmundson, 50, and wife Eva, 32.

In the 1930 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: on Highway 91, farmer Crumble Smith, 31; wife Ella, 30; and children Jeneva, 11, Tommy, 10, Minnie, 7, Mary, 5, Bessie, 4, Moses, 2, and Hattie, 1.

Rufus S. Edmundson died 13 May 1934 in Saratoga township. Per his death certificate, he was born in Greene County, North Carolina, to Green Edmundson; was married to Eva Edmundson; and was a farmer. Wiley Barnes was informant.

Ella Jane Smith died 23 December 1977 in Wilson County. Per her death certificate, she was born 20 August 1903 in Wilson County to Rufus Edmundson and Eva Rice; resided in Stantonsburg; and her informant was Geneva S. Anderson, 1630 Freeman Street Extension, Wilson.

——

Mid-century obituaries for two of Corner Line’s members:

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Wilson Daily Times, 1 February 1947.

Wilson Daily Times, 24 December 1952.

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Wilson Daily Times, 17 April 1993.

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Corner Line Primitive Baptist Church is now abandoned, but still stands on Speight School Road near its termination at Highway 264 Alternate. This Google Maps image dates to 2012.

 

Snaps, nos. 41: J. Frank and Annie Bell Green Barnes.

Among the pictures found in Emma Barnes Taylor‘s discarded photo album were these depicting her parents, Annie Bell Green Barnes and James Frank Barnes, possibly standing beside their home at 106 South Carroll Street in Wilson.

——

In the 1880 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: farmer George Barnes, 29; wife Silvester A., 24; and children John E., 5, Jacob H., 4, and James F., 1.

In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: carpenter Neverson Green, 45; wife Isabeler, 35; and children Mary J., 18, Annie B., 15, Oscar, 13, Ada, 11, Ora, 9, Rose L., 6, William O., 5, Lula B., 2, and Besse, 3 months; plus boarder Willie Alley, 21, farm laborer.

On 27 April 1904, Frank Barnes, 25, son of George and Sylvester Ann Barnes, married Anna Green, 20, daughter of Nelson Green, in Wilson. Fred M. Davis, Missionary Baptist minister, performed the ceremony in the presence of Peter Bynum, Boston Griffin and Dorsey Powell.

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Saratoga Road, store deliveryman Frank Barnes, 26; wife Annie, 26; and sons Charlie, 5, and Frank, 3.

In 1918, James F. Barnes registered for the World War I draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 12 January 1878; resided at 106 Fifth [later renamed Carroll] Street; was a laborer for Barnes Harrell Grocery Co., 112 Goldsboro Street; and his nearest relative was Annie B. Barnes.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 106 Carroll, owned and valued at $800, wholesale grocery supply clerk Frank Barnes, 50; wife Annie, 44; children Frank Jr., 22, a pool room janitor, Etta M., 11, James H., 6, and Jeraline, 4; son-in-law Jack Artist, 21, odd jobs laborer, and daughter Mildred, 17, tobacco factory hander.

Wilson Daily Times, 10 June 1930.

Like many in the early days of the Depression, the Barneses faced foreclosure in 1930. It appears that they lost the house, but continued to live in it as renters as reported in the 1940 census.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 106 South Carroll Street, rented at $20/month, Annie Barnes, 57; husband Frank Barnes, 62, wholesale grocery shipping clerk; children Frank Jr., 33, Hotel Cherry attendant; Etta, 21; James, 16; and Geraldine, 15; James Artis, 29, laborer, wife Mildred, 29, tobacco factory hanger, and their son Charlie, 10;  and lodgers Lara Jones, 22, housekeeper, and Lula Green, 42.

James Frank Barnes died 9 October 1951 at Mercy Hospital. Per his death certificate, he was born 12 January 1878 in Wilson County to George Barnes and Sylvester (last name unknown); lived at 106 South Carroll; and was a laborer. Annie B. Barnes was informant.

Annie Bell Barnes died 31 January 1974 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 12 March 1880 in Virginia to Nelson Green and Isabella Thorp; was a widow; and resided at 1702 Queen Street. Informant was son James Herman Green.

 

Barnes wounded at war.

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Wilson Daily Times, 18 February 1919.

Though this injury may have been slight, David Barnes Jr. returned from World War I a disabled veteran.

——

In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: hotel porter Dave Barnes, 40; wife Della; and children Walter, 20, William, 15, Lucy, 13, Dave, 5, and Viola, 11. [Walter, William, and Lucy were, in fact, Hineses — Della Hines Barnes’ children, and Viola Barnes was Dave Barnes by a previous marriage.]

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: hotel servant Dave Barnes, 50; wife Della, 50; and children William, 25, barber, Lucy, 23, Dave, 15, Bosey, 8, Mary, 7, John, 5, Sam, 3, and Carry, 1 month.

David Barnes registered for the World War I draft in 1917 in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 3 March 1895 in Wilson; was a barber for Tate & Hines; lived at 612 East Green; and was short, of medium build, with blue eyes and black hair.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 612 East Green, widow Della Barnes, 50; Cleveland Chick, 25, barber, and Dasy Chick, 23, both of South Carolina; and Della’s sons Dave, 24, and Otha, 17.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 613 East Green, valued at $8000, widow Della Barnes, 71, and sons Boysie, 26, and Dav., 35, barber.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 610 East Green, Minnie Nelson, 54, tobacco factory stemmer, and sons Marion, 23, odd jobs house cleaner, Styles, 23, waiter at the English Tavern, and James Edward, 22, dress shop delivery boy, all natives of Fayetteville, North Carolina; and roomer David Barnes, 40, a war veteran.

David Barnes registered for the World War II draft in 1942. Per his registration card, he was born 3 March 1898 in Wilson; was a disabled veteran; and lived at 610 East Green.

David Barnes died 12 May 1966 at the Veterans Administration Hospital in Durham, North Carolina. Per his death certificate, he was born 19 March 1897 in Wilson County to David Barnes and Della Hines; never married; had worked as a barber; and was a World War I veteran.

 

Liquor bust.

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Wilson Daily Times, 22 August 1944.

  • Clarence Barnes
  • Mark Jenkins — on 17 October 1944, the Daily Times reported that Jenkins received one year’s probation for a liquor law violation.
  • Gus Armstrong — the same article reported that Armstrong was sentenced to a year and a day at the Atlanta Federal Penitentiary for a liquor law violation.
  • Sam Moore — Moore also received a year and a day at Atlanta.

He swears he has been to work.

Freedman Reddick Barnes signed a labor contract with white farmer Elisha Barnes commencing in January 1866. After several months, when Elisha failed to pay Reddick wages, Reddick complained to the Goldsboro field office of the Freedman’s Bureau. Though Ben Barnes, another freedman, testified against him, Reddick seems to have won his case.

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Case of Reddick Barnes Freedman vs. Elisha Barnes white, Breach of Contract

Reddick Barnes freedman sweares that he has been to Work for Mr Barnes white for some time he general went to work at sun rise in the morning. Ben Barnes freeman testified that he has been to work with Reddick Barnes. And has often found him asleep and was not out in the morning to feed his stock went he went out. And left his quarters most every night and went to Town with out permission Mr Elisha Barnes always treated him well Mr Rett Barnes Testified that Reddick did not work as he should have done got up late in the morning and often caught him asleep on his plough in the field and caught him shelling corn.

Contract fairly broken by Reddick Barnes Freedman, Wilson July 12th 1866

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Reddick Barnes’ receipts.

Roll 17, Miscellaneous Records, Goldsboro Subassistant Commissioner’s Records, North Carolina Freedmen’s Bureau Field Office Records, 1863-1872, National Archives and Records Administration images, www.familysearch.org

“Work’s never hurt me”: The life of Willie R. Barnes.

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Wilson Daily Times, 24 April 1995.

In the spring of 1995, the Daily Times profiled Willie Roscoe Barnes, 84, long-time proprietor of Wardrobe Cleaners. He passed away the following year.

Highlights:

  • Willie R. Barnes began working at Wardrobe in 1923, when he was 13 years old.
  • He was an only child whose mother died when he was 6. His paternal grandmother reared him.
  • He attended Wilson Colored Graded School through third grade, then he “had to get out of there and go to work.” He first delivered groceries for H.W. Baxter’s store at Pender and Nash Streets. His second job was in a wood yard. He then went to work for Jim Barbour, whose Wardrobe Cleaners was across the street from Baxter’s.
  • At age 18, Barnes started dry-cleaning clothes. He eventually married Barbour’s widow.
  • He served in Morocco and Italy during World War II and at one point was assigned to guard Winston Churchill in Marrakech.
  • After the war, Barnes returned to Wilson, and he and his wife built a new facility on one of eight lots they owned on Elvie Street. The new cleaners faced Pender.
  • After his first wife died, he married a woman named Clementine. They live in a house they built on Elvie adjacent to the cleaners.
  • He scorned the quality and durability of modern fabrics.
  • He took up golf and joined the advisory board of Wedgewood Golf Course.
  • Long-time neighbor and customer Bertha H. Carroll noted that Barnes believed in helping people.
  • Long-time friend Herbert Woodard Sr., 87, said he and Barnes shared an interest in sports going back to the 1930s, often traveling to New York together to watch prize fights and the Yankees.

——

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1005 Atlantic, owned and valued at $2000, Nancey Barber, 30, widow and presser at pressing club; son James D., 14; widowed mother Linna Carroll, 63; and lodger Willie Barnes, 21, tobacco factory cooper.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1005 Atlantic, pool room owner Daniel Carroll, 27; wife Lenora, 24, sewing; widowed mother Lina, 76; sister Nannie Barber, 40, owner of pressing club; her son James Barber, 23, presser at pressing club; and roomer Willie Barnes, 28, pressing club tailor.

On 7 January 1957, Willie R. Barnes, 47, parents unknown, married Clementine Rogers, 46, daughter of Will and Carrie Rogers, in Wilson.

  • “grandmother” — Henrietta Farmer Lloyd died 16 December 1961 at Mercy Hospital. Per her death certificate, she was born 1 August 1886; her parents were unknown; she resided at Barnes Rest Home, 626 East Vance; and she was a widow. Informant was Willie R. Barnes, 732 Elvie Street.
  • Jim Barbour — James Daniel Barbour died 23 September 1959 at Mercy Hospital. Per his death certificate, he was born 19 September 1915 in Wilson County to James Barbour and Nannie Carroll; never married; resided at 1005 Atlantic Street; worked as a presser at Wardrobe Cleaners; and was a World War II veteran. Informant was Daniel Carroll, 715 Elvie Street.
  • “Barbour’s widow” — Barnes did not Barbour’s widow at all, but his mother Nannie Barbour (and per James Barbour’s World War II draft registration, she owned Wardrobe Cleaners.) Nannie Barbour Barnes died 13 April 1956 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 7 October 1897 in Henderson, North Carolina, to Daniel Carroll and Lina Coppedge; and worked in dry cleaning. The informant was Willie R. Barnes, 1005 Atlantic.
  • Clementine Rogers Barnes
  • Bertha H. Carroll — Bertha Bryant Hawkins Carroll’s husband Daniel Carroll was the brother of Willie Barnes’ wife Nannie Barbour Barnes.
  • Herbert Woodard Sr.

Willie R. Barnes registered for the World War II draft in 1940.