Barnes

William Barnes plantation.

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“[T]he William Barnes house was built in a style which was popular in Wilson County between 1848 and 1860. Barnes was the brother of General Joshua Barnes, one of the most influential men in the area and a founder of Wilson County. Barnes was born in 1811. Like his brother, he was a planter, and by the time of his death he had accumulated over 1,000 acres. …The exterior of the Barnes house has remained basically unaltered except for the constriction of a two-story portico with Doric columns which dates circa 1914. The William Barnes House is very similar stylistically to the house of his brother. General Joshua Barnes, which was built circa 1845. The exterior consists of a plain two-story box with a shallow hipped-roof and a three-bay facade. A wide trabeated entrance, surmounted by a smaller door on the second floor, is located in the central bay. The unusual six-panel door is similar to those found on the Daniel Whitley House (also in Stantonsburg Township). The interior plan is that of a wide center hall with two large rooms located on each side. Major alterations have been made on the interior. A large two-story packhorse and small gable-roof storage building, both contemporary with the house, exist on the grounds.” — Kate Ohno, Wilson County’s Architectural Heritage (1981).

In the 1860 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County, 48 year-old farmer William Barnes’ listing notes that he owned real property valued at $35,000 and personal property at $89,000. The latter, of course, largely consisted of enslaved men and women, whose crucial role on his plantation went unmentioned in the description above. The 1860 census credits him as the owner of 10 men or boys and 16 women or girls, ranging in age from 1 to 60.

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Aerial shot of the Barnes House and outbuildings at the intersection of Fairfield Dairy Road and Highway 58.

Photograph of Barnes house taken by Lisa Y. Henderson, December 2015.

Nadal’s neighbors.

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This plat, drawn in September 1905, shows an irregular plot of land near Nash and Pended Streets. Part of the Anthony Nadal estate, the tract measured just under three acres. Wilson’s African-American community had begun to coalesce east of Pender, across from First Baptist Church, Saint John’s A.M.E. Zion and Calvary Presbyterian, and a close look at the plat shows some of Nadal’s neighbors.

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  1. John Mack Barnes, master builder, carpenter and brickmason, who would soon built Saint John, among other fine brick buildings.
  2. John W. Aiken, a horse dealer and liveryman.
  3. Rev. Owen L.W. Smith, just returned from his stint as consul to Liberia.
  4. John S. Spell, carpenter and contractor.
  5. Darden Alley, named for the Charles H. Darden family and called so to this day.

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Plat Book 1, page 17, Wilson County Register of Deeds Office, Wilson.

Lossie B. Barnes, 99.

Lossie Marie Baker Barnes died peacefully at her residence on Aug. 26, 2011.
The funeral will be held Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2011, at 11 a.m. at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, 106 S. Reid St. Interment will follow in Rest Haven Cemetery.

Lossie Baker was born in Wilson County on April 23, 1912. She was the fourth child of James and Mollie Williams Baker. She was a vibrant, active and youthful woman as indicated in the accompanying photograph taken at age 98. In 1929, she married Clarence W. Barnes and was widowed in 2000. They were married for 71 years. Mrs. Barnes was a member of the Book and Garden Club, Starlight Chapter 251 of the Order of Eastern Star and the C.H. Darden High School Alumni Association. She was a loyal supporter of the Frederick Douglass High School (Elm City) Band Mothers; and, in the days when resources were nonexistent, she actually made majorette uniforms for the band. She was an active supporter of the Frederick Douglass High School Alumni Association’s Scholarship program, assisting high school graduates who wished to attend college. At the time of her death she was the oldest known member of St. Mark’s Episcopal Church. Mrs. Barnes and her husband farmed for many years in Wilson County. However she is best known as one of the best, if not the best, seamstresses in Wilson County. In the late 1940s and 1950s, Mrs. Barnes made dresses for women for $2 and suits for men for $4 in order to send her oldest daughter to college. She was also an accomplished dressmaker and upholsterer, but even more exceptional were her skills in all aspects of interior design and commercial and residential drapery making. For many years she was head of the drapery department at J.C. Penney and Company and she also worked for Brewer Interiors in Rocky Mount. Lossie Baker Barnes was not a talker but rather a woman of action.

Surviving are five daughters of whom she was very proud: Marie Barnes Jones, Mollie Grace Barnes Corbin, Verona Barnes True, Jeraldene Barnes Massey and Alice Barnes Freeman (Charles); 11 grandchildren, Edwina Jones Simons (Craig), Raynite Corbin, Phillip Clarence Corbin (Deborah), Winifred Corbin-Ward (David), Aaron True, Rachel True, Noel Lossie True King (Robert), Stephanie Marie Massey, Alice Ray Massey, Charles E. Freeman (Julie), and Lossie Marie Freeman-Ross (Stephen); 10 great-grandchildren, Christopher Simons, Tiffany Simons, Javar Corbin, Justin Corbin, Taylor Marie Corbin, Gurvey Malone, Truman King, Clarence King, Neil Oliver Freeman and Nathan Freeman Ross; five nieces, Christine B. Ritchie, Catherine B. Slade, Ruby B. Spoons, Romain B. Harris and Mavis B. Harris; one nephew, Herbert Baker; and many other family members and friends.

Public viewing will be held Tuesday from 2 to 6 p.m. with the family receiving friends from 6 to 8 p.m. at the funeral home.

In lieu of flowers memorial contributions may be directed to St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, P.O. Box 4405 Wilson, NC 27894 or to the Frederick Douglass High School Alumni Association Scholarship Fund, P.O. Box 2562 Wilson, NC 27894. The funeral cortege will depart 703 Blakewood St. at 10 a.m. on Wednesday.

Professional and personal services are entrusted to Edwards Funeral Home, 805 E. Nash St. Condolences may be directed to edwardscares.com.

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In the 1920 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: on Nash Road, farmer James Baker, 40, wife Mollie, 33, and children Irena, 14, Moses, 12, Rony, 10, and Lossie, 7.

Clarence Barnes, 18, of Taylors township, son of Lovett and Lucy Barnes, married Lossie Baker, 16, of Wilson, daughter of Jim and Mollie Baker, on 21 January 1929. Rev. G.A. Wood, an A.M.E. Zion minister, performed the ceremony at his residence in the presence of Frank Harrison, McKinley Barnes and Victoria Barnes.

In the 1940 census of Taylors township, Wilson County: farmer Clarence Barnes, 29; wife Lossie, 27; and children Marie, 10, Molly Gray, 9, and Virginia, 2; plus mother-in-law Molly Baker, 50.

The last will and testament of Henry Jones, alias Barnes.

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In May 1903, Samuel H. Vick swore in Superior Court that he had witnessed Henry Jones, alias Barnes, make his mark on will. Because Walter Hulin was deceased, his widow Hattie Hulin swore to the validity of his signature on the document.

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In the 1870 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farm laborer Henry Barnes, 35, and wife Milah, 30.

In the 1880 census of Wilson, Wilson County: farm laborer Henry Barnes, 52; wife Mila, 40; son Amanuel Robins, 22; and boarder John Hardy, 20.

On 2 August 1899, Walter B. Hulin, 21, married Hattie Artis, 18, at the Artis home in Wilson. Rev. W.B. Perry, Episcopal, performed the ceremony in the presence of James Artis, Irine Winstead and Mrs. Barnes.

Mily Barnes died intestate in the late summer of 1909. Dr. F.S. Hargrave applied for letters of administration for her estate, estimated at $100 value.

 

North Carolina Wills and Estates, 1665-1998 [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com.

A short resume of E.M. Barnes’ life.

A SHORT RESUME OF MY LIFE

By Edward M. Barnes

I hasten to state that the use of this statement should be in the third person. To me, it is not important enough to be presented on my own.

I was born in Wilson, N.C. what seems to me now a short time ago – to poor, humble and devoted parents: Elizabeth and Lemon Barnes. Their educational background was minimal but they worked hard and were determined that their children would receive the best of life that was available to them at the time.

Times were difficult, to say the least, because it was the beginning of the “Great Depression.” For those parents born since the inauguration of President Roosevelt, it is hard to understand the meaning of “difficult times.”

The experience I had during my growing years were many. If time and space permitted my telling about them, I am sure you would get a good laugh out of some of them and you would feel sorry for me in many others. I am, however, so happy to have come this far and I have so much for which to thank God, my parents and a multitude of teachers and friends.

The Act That Mobilized a Community!

Much of my early education took place in the midst of turmoil that developed when the “white” superintendent of schools slapped a black teacher in the presence of our “black” principal. To say that all hell broke loose would be putting it mildly.

An Independent School Is Born

Our only public school was emptied of all the students and a private one was formed and operated for many years on the few pennies that parents were able to find to pay for teachers and others in the school’s operation. Standards of good education were necessarily diminished but, in spite of that, many of those students became leaders in activities of national importance.

The Independent School was housed in one of Mr. Sam Vick‘s houses on E. Vance St.

Miss Georgia Burke

Miss Georgia Burke was one of the teachers at the Graded School when the slapping incident happened. With her outstanding musical abilities, she became one of the chief fund raisers to keep the school operating.

She put on lavish concerts in the old Vick Globe Theater. She held two-day commencement exercises in warehouses in order to raise funds to keep the school operating for about 8 or 10 years. The school operated until well after the Wilson Colored High School was built in 1923.

Miss Burke went on to became a famous musical star on New York’s Broadway stage.

A “Poor Soul” Goes To College And Becomes A Principal

This poor soul, at the insistence of Rev. A.H. George, went to Livingstone College without ever having been accepted as a student nor even having made application.

Through sheer determination and with very little money, I was able to stay there eight years, graduating from both its high school and college. Upon graduation, in 1931, I came directly to the Wilson Colored High School which later became C.H. Darden High School.

At that time, the principal was having some difficulty with the people of the community. It seemed to stem from his refusal to hire high school teachers from Wilson. I came as teh first high school teacher from Wilson. I taught classes in French and English for one year and part of the second year. During my second year, the principal died in his office on the day we were to close for the Christmas holidays. After his death, the superintendent asked me to take over the supervision of the school until he could find a replacement. I waited 38 years until John W. Jones became the replacement in 1969 — upon my retirement!

During the first five years of my retirement, I served part-time in the office of the superintendent. Time will not permit me to tell of the many pleasant experiences that I had during my tenure as principal. There are many teachers, staff members and other workers who helped me; without them, I would have had no measure of success. Perhaps my greatest pleasure and indeed success — if I had any — came from the many students who were under my supervision. I see so many every day who tell me of the help that I gave them and of the role model that I represented to them. Believe me, those kinds of comments mean more to me than any other things that they could do or say. I must say, however, that pleasures and good times were not all of my experiences. My share of headaches and heartaches cannot be over-looked for there were many of them.

In addition to my school work, I also have a degree of pride in the community service that I undertook during my working years and after retirement.

It was my pleasure to work for 10 years on the Wilson County Library Board, serving during the time of the renovation of the public library. I value the appearance of my name on the corner stone of the new addition to that building.

Before becoming a member of the Wilson County Housing Authority, I served on a city appointed Commission that began the improvements of the blighted areas of our city. The Commission had the responsibility of cleaning up those areas. It took ten years and many legal and other problems to clear before the work on that project could be completed. After that time, I — along with some of the others who had worked on the Commission — were merged with the Wilson Housing Authority. During the ten years that I worked with this group, (serving two terms as chairman) many projects were completed, including Tasman Towers. I shall always be grateful to the Authority and to the City of Wilson for naming a project after me — The E.M. Barnes Manor. I hope that such action is not a prelude to my death.

I am very proud of the part that I played in the organization of our local unit of the Retired Teachers Association. Its history is more complete in its file. However, at the time we had no association in Wilson that was connected with the State organization. I was asked to head a group with a responsibility to organize one. I took that responsibility. I visited personally many persons, pleading for their membership. Some accepted; many refused. We were very fortunate to get Mrs Sallie Lanier to serve as the first president. Many of our first contacts ware still with us. It is delightful to know that our local association is nor one of the largest and most active in the state.

Over the years, I had the honor of serving on many committees and working with many groups. We worked with the group that organized a Community Human Relations Commission. For many years it made a Commendable contribution to our community. For some reasons, it has now lost its effectiveness.

I am proud, also, to have had a part in organizing our Men’s Civic Club, composed of a group of Black men with similar interests. It was never intended to be a representative of the City; we wanted a social group but with equal community interests. We may now be the only continuously operated organization in the city of Wilson. We have met at least once a month for 50 years.

There are many other community organizations with which I have served, but my promised brief statement does not permit me to mention them by name. I tried to perform well in them all.

I cannot close without mentioning at least two more, however, that are second to none. I joined and attended the Presbyterian church when I was a child — too young to go alone. I have always thought of myself as a Christian, but it was not until after my retirement that being a Christian means more than just words. It includes action and lots of it. I learned my church after my retirement. Before that, Darden High School was my only real interest. Since retirement I have learned much and done much to promote a viable church. For many years I have been closely connected with my church on the local, regional and national levels. Our national church was split over one hundred years ago over the existence of slavery.

We are now in the process of coming together again. I have had the honor of serving on the local and regional levels of two very important committees. We had the responsibility of doing the “leg work” on both. I am happy to state the configuration that was recommended by the committee that I chaired has been accepted by the total group and we are now in the process of operating as a new national church beginning January 1, 1989.

The second and final statement concerns my family. Odelle [Whitehead Barnes] and I have been married for 51 years. We are now trying to determine which of us should have the medal, but we will never agree on that question. I can only say that they have been for me, 51 happy years. Odelle, Carolyn [Barnes Kent] (our daughter) and the boys (grandchildren): Howard (Howie) and Edward (Eddie) — are my life.

I refuse to say more.                     Wilson, N.C. 1988

This memoir by Edward Morrison Barnes (1905-2002) appears to have been published by the C.H. Darden High School Alumni Association circa 1988. Photograph courtesy of 1950 edition of The Trojan, the yearbook of C.H. Darden High School.

106 North Reid Street.

The twenty-fifth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for East Wilson Historic District: “ca. 1930; 2 stories; George White Vick House; Colonial Revival house with hip-roofed popular in district; wraparound porch with classical columns; fine example of the style; Vick was son of S.H. Vick, and operated taxi service.”

There is no listing for 106 North Reid in the 1930 census (or earlier); the house presumably was built shortly thereafter. In the 1930 Hill’s city directory of Wilson, there is a George W. White listed at the address. Is this a typographical error? Was George W. Vick actually the resident?  Other records suggest that he did not live in the house until after World War II.

On 23 October 1937, George White Vick, 32, son of Samuel and Annie Vick, married Blanche Curry, 25, daughter of Worth and Isabel Curry, in Nashville, Nash County.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1109 1/2 Washington Street, taxi driver George Vick, 34, and wife Blanche, 22, tobacco factory stemmer. At 106 North Reid: Ernest Jones, 34, tobacco factory truck driver; wife Nancy, 28, tobacco factory laborer; and sister Daisy Lindsey, 12; Ernest Barnes, 27, tobacco factory grader, and his wife Louvenia, 27, tobacco factory laborer; and Sylvester Page, 32. All three families rented rooms in the large house.

In 1942, George White Vick registered for the World War II draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 9 June 1903; resided at 1109 1/2 Washington Street; worked for Safety Taxi Company; and his nearest relative was Mrs. S.H. Vick of 622 East Green Street.

George White Vick died 24 June 1985 in Wilson.

Photograph by Lisa Y. Henderson, February 2017.

He knows nothing of the death of his wife.

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Wilson Daily Times, 25 October 1918.

Lucy Barnes‘ death certificate:

In the 1900 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: Ransom Ruffin, 30; wife Maggie, 33; and children Claudius, 7, Floyd, 6, and Selia Ruffin, 3; plus “son-in-law” William Barnes, 17, and “daughters-in-law” Lucy, 15, and Bertha Barnes, 13. [The Barneses were Ransom Ruffin’s step-children rather than his in-laws. Allen Barnes, presumably, had died, and Ruffin was Maggie’s second husband.]

On 2 December 1903, Lucy Barnes, 21, daughter of Allen Barnes and Maggie Ruffin, married Amos Bynum, 23, son of Joe and Hagar Bynum, in Wilson County. Ransom Ruffin, R.M. Joyner and Pattie Williams were witnesses. [Why, then, was Lucy a Barnes on her death certificate?]

In the 1910 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: on Plank Road, farmer Amos Bynum, 31; wife Lucy, 25; and daughters Clyde, 8, and Penny, 4 months. [The article describes three small children. Clyde was probably the daughter who stepped in to care for her younger siblings, including Penny and a son Amos Bynum Jr. (Lucy and Amos are listed on his 1946 marriage license and his death certificate.)]

The Hines-White wedding.

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New York Age, 13 June 1912.

  • Mr. and Mrs. Dave Barnes — Dave Barnes and Della Hines Barnes. On 15 April 1894, David Barnes, 35, married Della Hines, 32, in Wilson. Rev. Fred M. Davis performed the ceremony at the bride’s home in the presence of J.T. Deans. Mrs. Hardy Tate, and Hardy Tate. In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: hotel porter Dave Barnes, 40; wife Della, 40; and children Walter, 24; William, 15; Lucy, 13; Dave, 5; and Viola, 11. [Though all the children were named Barnes, the oldest three were in fact Della’s children and were named Hines. Viola was Dave’s child with his first wife, Pattie Battle.]
  • Lucy P. Hines — On 5 June 1912, Lucy P. Hines, 21, of Wilson, daughter of William Hines and Della Barnes Hines, married John L. White, 27, of Hampton, Virginia, son of William and Mary R. White (resident of Hingham Centre, Massachusetts), at the bride’s parents’ home. W.S. Hines applied for the license, and Presbyterian minister H.B. Taylor performed the ceremony in the presence of  M.E. Dortch of Goldsboro, North Carolina; J.M. Parker of Rocky Mount, North Carolina; and [illegible] B. Thomas of Washington, D.C.
  • J.L. White — In the 1900 census of Hingham, Plymouth County, Massachusetts: carpenter William White, 53; wife Mary R., 53; children John L., 15, Edgar, 10, and Sadie, 23; granddaughter Beatrice, 2; plus mother-in-law Frances D. Hogan. William was born in New York to a New York-born father and English mother. Mary was born in Massachusetts to a native Massachusetts father and New Hampshire-born mother. Frances was born in New Hampshire. In 1918, John Leonard White registered for the World War I draft in Nashville, Tennessee. Per his registration card, he was born 26 May 1885; worked as the director of the Department of Agriculture of A.&I. State Normal School [now Tennessee State University]; and Lucile P. White was his nearest relative.
  • Walter Hines — Walter Scott Hines.
  • Wm. Hines — William Hines.
  • Sallie Hines
  • Rev. H.B. Taylor

Jennette Best Barnes.

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Jeannette Best Barnes (circa 1880-1947)

In the 1870 census of Stantonsburg, Wilson County: Isaac Winstead, 52; wife Jane, 35; and children Edith, 10, Robert, 7, Amanda, 3, and Aneliza, 1. [Edith and Robert’s last name was, in fact, Farmer; they were Jane’s children from a previous marriage.]

On 30 August 1877, Sam Best, 22, married Edith Winston, 20, at the residence of D.G.W. Ward, Justice of the Peace. Edward Whitehead, Lawrence Ward and Scott Ward were witnesses. [Note: One hundred years later, Sam and Edith’s granddaughter Minnie Bell Barnes Barnes rented the house that had been David D.G. Ward‘s.]

In the 1880 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: farmer Isaac Winstead, 60; wife Jane; children Manda, 14, Ann, 12, Charlie, 10, Major, 7, Lucy, 4, and Levi, 1; stepchildren Ada [Edith] Best, 20, and Rob Farmer, 17; and grandchildren Sam, 3, and Mary Best, 1.

On 22 December 1898, Redman Barnes, 24, son of Calvin and Cely Barnes, married Jennet Best, 20, daughter of Sam Best and Edy Strickland, at W.H. Applewhite’s in Stantonsburg. Witnesses were Frank Farmer of Wilson County, Julius Ruffin of Stantonsburg and Charlie Ruffin of Moyton.

In the 1900 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: farm laborer Redmond Barnes, 25; wife Genette, 21; and daughter Dora, 8 months.

In the 1920 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: tenant farmer Redman Barnes, 47; wife Genette, 43; children Dora, 20, Fred, 19, Mary E., 17, Minie B., 15, Eddie Bell, 13, Petcandy, 11, Nora Lee, 9, Alice, 7, Lula Mae, 4, and Redman Jr., 1.

In the 1930 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: farmer Raymond Barnes, 59; wife Jeanette, 50; children Dora, 29, Fred, Fred, 25, Mary, 23, Minnie B., 20, Edith, 18, Bettie L., 17, Nora L., 16, Alice J., 14, Lula Mae, 12, Raymond Jr., 10, and John H., 8; and nephew Author Ellis, 20.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1116 East Nash Street, Mary Barnes, 33, who taught at Healthy Plains Grade School; her widowed mother Jenettie Barnes, 62; brothers Redman, 22, a shoe repairer at Rex Shoe Shop, and John, 19, a tobacco factory laborer; brother-in-law Doll Speight, 26, apartment elevator operator; sister Lula, 23, and their daughters Letrice, 2, and Bettie, 8 months.

Jennette Barnes died 3 April 1947 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 18 June 1886 in Wilson County to Samuel Best and Edith Winstead; was widowed; and resided at 1116 East Nash Street. Mary Estell Barnes of the same address was informant.

Photograph courtesy of Ancestry.com user skeeweept.

Denied: too old.

Documents from the pension application file of Lizzie Woodard, daughter of Union army veteran London Woodard of Wilson County:

On 22 August 1933, Lizzie Woodard of 119 Ashe Street, Wilson, filed a Declaration for Pension for Children Under Sixteen Years of Age, claiming benefits for herself and her sister Mamie Woodard as children of London Woodard. The declaration noted that London Woodard enlisted 10 July 1861 at Wilson, North Carolina, in the “Col. Army.” London was not wounded in service and was discharged 11 November 1865. He died 10 February 1931. Lizzie Woodard was 37 years old; her sister, 35. Their mother, Grace Woodard, had been London’s second wife when they married 30 November 1886. The first, whom he married in 1874, died without issue. Paul Bunch of Black Creek and Martha Allen of Wilson witnessed Lizzie’s signature.

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Unfortunately, in January 1934, the Pension Authority summarily rejected the Woodards’ application “on the ground that the children of the alleged soldier were over 16 years of age at the date of his death.”

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This was not Elder London Woodard, who founded London’s Primitive Baptist Church. Rather, this was his grandson London, son of Howell and Rhoda Woodard.

In the 1870 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: farm laborer Howell Woodard, 52; wife Rodah, 40; and children London, 23, Harriet, 20, Venus, 19, Ferebee, 17, Virginia, 17, Mary, 14, Sarah, 13, Penelope, 12, Rodah, 10, Puss, 6, John, 8, Kenny, 5, Fanny, 1, and Martha, 1 month.

In 22 November 1877, London Woodard, 30, married Margaret Guest, 24, at Richard Haggans’ house. G.T. Daniel, Ned Barnes and Jim Bynum witnessed.

In the 1880 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: London Woodard, 34; wife Margaret, 26; and children James G., 9, and Alley, 7. (The children were likely Margaret’s from a previous relationship.)

On 27 November 1895, London Woodard, 47, married Nancy Webb, 23, in Gardners township at the bride’s parents’ home. Adella E. Barnes, Jane R. Farmer and Martha Woodard witnessed.

In the 1900 census of Town of Wilson, Wilson County: farmer London Woodard, age unknown; wife Nancy, 28; children Lizzie, 3, and Mamie, 1; brother-in-law Joseph Webb, 17, and sister-in-law Rhodie Webb, 13.

In the 1910 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: farmer London Woodard, 62, divorced.

Nancy, however, did not report their divorce to the enumerator. In the 1910 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: Nancy Woodard, 33, widow, and children Lizzie, 14, Mamie, 11, Hubbard, 4, and David, 2. (Apparently, “Hubbard” — in fact, Herbert — and David were not London’s children, as they were not parties to the pension application.)

Though she applied for benefits using her maiden name, Lizzie Woodard, 20, daughter of Lum and Nancy Woodard, married Dock Barnes, 24, son of Rhodes and Frances Barnes, in Rocky Mount, North Carolina, on 1 November 1913.

In the 1920 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: farmer London Woodard, 75, widower.

In the 1920 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: on Lipscomb Road, wagon factory laborer James Barnes, 29; wife Lizzie, 23; children Estelle, 11, and Lenard, 5; sister-in-law Mamie Woodard, 21; and boarders John Hollins, 22, Rose Barnes, 18, Pete Barnes, 19, and Tom Outlaw, 21.

Mamie Woodard, 29, married Thomas Outlaw, 29, on 19 November 1929. Witnesses were W.I. Barnes, John A. Barnes Jr., and Elisha L. Webb.

Lizzie Woodard Barnes died 26 November 1959 in Wilson.

Mamie Woodard Outlaw died 28 December 1988 in Beaufort, Washington County, North Carolina.

File #1,734,955, Application of Lizzie Woodard et al. for Children’s Pension, National Archives and Records Administration.