Barnes

Cemeteries, no. 24: the Barnes family.

We pulled over on the side of the highway here, got out and started trudging along the treeline. The ground was saturated from heavy winter rains, and I had not worn the right shoes. Nonetheless, we traipsed back and forth, looking for the Simon and Penninah Woodard Barnes cemetery.

Barnes/Woodard/Lassiter descendant Bernard Patterson had graciously offered to help me find it. However, the land is no longer family-owned, and he had not been there in many years. We did our best, but a thick growth of broomsedge, prickly smilax vines, and young trees prevented us from locating it.

Penninah was the daughter of London and Penelope Lassiter Woodard. She married Simon Barnes on 1 January 1877 in Wilson County, and they and several generations of their descendants are buried in a family graveyard located off what is now N.C. Highway 42. The photo of Pennie Barnes’ grave, below, was taken during a period in which the plot was cleared. Eastern North Carolina’s climate makes rural cemetery maintenance a serious challenge, especially when graves are located on private property far from paved roads and the cemetery is not in active use for burials.

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Thanks again to Bernard Patterson. Top photo by Lisa Y. Henderson, February 2019; bottom photo courtesy of Roger Barron.

 

Notice of intention to disinter.

On sequential weeks in April and May 2006, the Wilson Daily Times ran this Notice of Intention to Disinter, Remove and Reinter Graves.

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Notice is hereby given to the known and unknown relatives of those persons buried in The Wilder Family Cemetery located in Springhill Township, Wilson County North Carolina and being described as follows: BEING all Tract No. 1 containing 130.94 (C/L of Creek & Branches); Tract No. 2 containing 24.84 acres (C/L/ of Road & Branch); Tract No. 3 containing 11.17 acres (to C/L of Road); and Tract No. 4 containing 4.20 acres (to C/L of Road), as shown on a map entitled “Survey for Kemit David Brame, Jr., Property of Charles B. Brame, Jr., et al,” which map is recorded in Plat Book 27, page 204, Wilson County Registry; for reference see Deeds recorded in Book 125, page 583, Book 249, page 313, Book 249, page 322, Book 290, page 306, Book 381, page 37, and Book 419, page 218, Wilson County Registry. Being better described as approximately 500′ northwest of the intersection of NC#42 Highway and Neal Road (SR #1198).

KNOWNS

There are 2 marked graves said cemetery, Josiah Wilder DOB – April 5, 1866, DOD – April 22, 1919; Elizabeth Wilder Barnes, DOB October 5 1898, DOD – July 23, 1928.

UNKNOWNS

There are approximately 8-10 unknown (unmarked) graves in said cemetery; that all of the graves will be relocated and reentered in the Rocky Creek United Church of Christ Cemetery, located on NC #581 Highway, Kenly, North Carolina. Also the grave of Chestiney Earp Wilder, DOB – July 11, 1869, DOD – January 10 1957 will be relocated from the southeast corner of the cemetery to the northwest corner of the cemetery. Then a complete record of where these deceased person will be reentered will be on file with the Wilson County Registry of Deeds, Wilson, North Carolina. You are further notified that the graves are being moved under the provisions of North Carolina General Statute #65-13, and that the removals will not begin until this notice has been published four (4) successive times in The Wilson Daily Times, Wilson, North Carolina and until approval to do so has been given by the Wilson City Council, Wilson, North Carolina. This the 3rd day of April, 2006.    R. Ward Sutton [address omitted] ***

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Here is the rough map of the site attached to the Removal of Graves Certificate and filed with the Wilson County Registry of Deeds: 

The Certificate gives two reasons as “basis for removal” — (1) to give perpetual care, (2) subdivision development. This Google Maps aerial view of the former Josiah Wilder property clearly shows the subdivision that now covers the former site of his family’s cemetery:

As shown in this photograph posted to Findagrave.com, the Wilder family’s new plot at Rocky Branch cemetery is marked with an explanatory headstone:

Capture

Cemeteries, no. 23: the Taylor-Barnes cemetery.

Deborah Webb sent the tip a month ago — there was an abandoned graveyard off Webb Lake Road that contained the remains of an unknown African-American family. After my library talk Tuesday, I got some additional directions, and yesterday morning I set out it find it.

L. and T. Speight gave permission for me to park in their driveway and pointed out the copse out back. Standing in the middle of a turned-under corn field, such a stand of woods is a tell-tale sign of a cemetery.

It was a fight getting in. The smilax is ferocious. Breaking through though, I could see unmarked, subsided graves across the forest floor.

I saw no headstones, and only two graves bore small metal funeral home markers, meant to be temporary. The paper inserts identifying the dead were long gone.

Toward the back, there was a single vault. Its concrete and brick cover had collapsed at one end, exposing the interior. I did not disturb it to search for a name. Mr. Speight told me that the graveyard had been there when his grandfather bought the farm in 1938, that the last burial had been more than 30 years ago, and that he thought the family was named Barnes.

Wilson County Genealogical Society has published several volumes of transcribed cemetery records. I didn’t have access to my copies, so I consulted Joan Howell, the tireless spirit behind the project. She called me back this morning with an ID. This is the Aaron Barnes cemetery, first surveyed in 1991. It was overgrow even then, with only the vault and two metal markers visible among the 33 identifiable burial sites. Two graves bore names — Aaron Barnes (1888-1951) and Pattie J. Taylor, who died 3 January 1953 at age 16.

Here is Aaron Barnes’ death certificate:

Aaron Barnes had been a World War veteran, and his widow Martha Barnes applied for a military headstone for his grave:

Theirs was a late marriage. Aaron Barnes, 50, of Gardners township, son of Jarman and Mollie Barnes, married Martha Lancaster, 38, of Gardners, daughter of John D. and Susan Lancaster, on 3 November 1938 in Wilson.

Though the cemetery is called Taylor’s on Aaron Barnes’ records, and presumably most of the burials were of members of that family, I have not found information about young Pattie J. Taylor. However, Lillie Taylor died 17 January 1941 in Gardners township and, per her death certificate, she was born 6 January 1882; was married to James Taylor; was born in Wilson County to Jarman and Mollie Barnes; and was buried in Taylors cemetery near Elm City. Also, Lillie and James H. Taylor’s male infant was stillborn on 24 December 1917 in Gardners township and was buried at “Taylors place.”

Photographs by Lisa Y. Henderson, February 2019. Many thanks to Deborah Webb, L. and T. Speight, and Joan Howell.

1202 Carolina Street.

The ninety-seventh in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1930; 1-story; bungalow; gable-end form with entry porch.”

In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Mercer Leroy (c; Mattie) driver h1202 Carolina

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Barnes Matthew M (c; Ossie M) carp h1202 Carolina

Circa 1940, Maxie Gause registered for the World War II draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 30 October 1908 in Marion, South Carolina; his contact was mother Rosa McDaniel Gause, 1202 Carolina Street; and he worked for R.P. Watson Tobacco Company, Wilson.

In 1940, Edward Gause registered for the World War II draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 1 May 1917 in Mullins, South Carolina; his contact was mother Rosie Gause, 1202 Carolina Street; and he worked for E.J. O’Brien Tobacco Company, Goldsboro Street, Wilson.

In 1940, Russell Gause registered for the World War II draft in Washington, D.C. Per his registration card, he was born 8 August 1910 in Pillin, South Carolina; he resided at 418 Eighth Street, S.E., Washington (crossed out, then 1202 Carolina Street, Wilson, also crossed out); his contact was mother Rosa Gause, 1202 Carolina Street; and he worked for Highway Engineering Company, Washington, D.C.

In 1940, William Gause registered for the World War I draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 2 October 1919 in Mullins, South Carolina; his contact was mother Rosa Gause, 1202 Carolina Street; and he worked for Watson Tobacco Company, Wilson.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory there are listings at 1202 Carolina for six members of the Gause family: Edward Jr. (laborer), Mack (farmer), Rosa, Russell (laborer), William (laborer) and Wilson (laborer).

Photograph by Lisa Y. Henderson, October 2018.

He lived a fine Christian life.

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Wilson Daily Times, 22 July 1944.

In the 1880 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: farmer Wade Barnes, 33; wife Adline, 25; children John, 6, Willis, 3, and Varina, 1; and Dury Simons, 60.

On 23 November 1894, John A. Barnes, 21, of Wilson County, married Sarah Jane Staten, 23, of Wilson County, at Margarett Staten‘s in Wilson. Witnesses were Aaron Sharp, William Weaver and George Weaver.

In the 1900 census of Gardners township, Wilson County:  day laborer Johnny Barnes, 25; wife Sarah, 29; and children Victoria, 10, Robert, 8, Ella, 2, and Johnny, 8 months.

In the 1910 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: John Barnes, 36, church preacher; wife Sarah, 38, dressmaker; and children Robert, 16, Mary E., 12, John E., 11, Wade, 8, Rosa L., 4, and Frank, 3.

In the 1920 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: on Lipscomb Road, farmer John A. Barnes, 44; wife Sarah J., 45; and children Ella M., 22, John, 20, Wade, 17, Rosa L., 15, Frank, 12, Willie C., 10, Bessie M.C., 8, Roy L., 7, and Elson, 6. John Jr. and Wade worked as wagon factory laborers.

In the 1930 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: at 739 Lipscomb, owned and valued at $2000, farmer John A. Barnes, 55; wife Sarah, 55; aunt Lucy Bynum, 65; and son Frank W., 23, cook at cafe.

Mary Ella Barnes died 24 March 1934 at Mercy Hospital. Per her death certificate, she was born 1 July 1897 in Wilson County to John Allen Barnes of Wilson County and Sarah Jane Staton of Tarboro; was single; worked as a laundress; and resided at 403 Viola Street.

In the 1940 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: at 739 Lipscomb Road, garden worker John A. Barnes, 65; wife Sarah J., 71; son John A., Jr., body work-Hackney Bus Bodies; daughter-in-law Emma, 35, laundry; son Wade, 36; grandson James D., 17; and grandchildren George, 15, Odell, 13, and Margaret McAllister, 10, and Inez Tart, 9.

John Allen Barnes died 20 July 1944 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 25 January 1879 in Wilson County to Wade Barnes and Adeline Bynum; was married to Sarah Jane Barnes; lived at 739 Lipton [Lipscomb] Street; and was a preacher.

Robbed of Christmas savings.

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Wilson Daily Times, 12 December 1925.

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On 12 January 1868, Wright Barnes, son of Harry Taylor and Nelly Barnes, married Jane Strickland, daughter of Redrick and Mary Strickland, in Wilson County.

In the 1870 census of Joyners township, Wilson County: farm laborer Wright Barnes, 22, wife Jane, 19, and daughter Henrietta, 7 months.

In the 1880 census of Taylors township, Wilson County: farmer Wright Barnes, 31; wife Jane, 29; and children Henrietta, 11, Susan, 9, Della, 8, William W., 7, Mattie, 5, and John R., 4 months.

In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: farm laborer Wright Barnes, 51; wife Jane, 50; and children Mattie, 21, James, 17, Bessie L., 14, Willie, 12, Mary A., 11, George, 9, Jane, 6, and Fannie, 4.

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Finch Mill Road, farm laborer Wright Barnes, 61; wife Jane, 58; and children Mary A., 17, George, 15, Jane Jr., 14, and Fannie, 13.

Janie Barnes died 18 June 1917 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was 21 months old; was born in Wilson County to Wright Barnes and Janie Conn. Informant was Bessie Smith.

Wilson Daily Times, 20 January 1920.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Park Avenue, street ditcher Wright Barnes, 71, and wife Jane, 68.

Henrietta Flemmings died 29 August 1921 in Township #12, Edgecombe County. Per her death certificate, she was born 1881 in Wilson County to Wright Barnes and Jane Barnes and was married to Henry Fleming.

Mattie Davis died 28 October 1933 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was 62 years old; was born in Wilson County to Wright Barnes and Jane Strickland; resided on Church Street, Wilson; worked as a laundress; and was married to Charley Davis.

Susianna Blount died 11 June 1936 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was 60 years old; was born in Wilson County to Wright Barnes and Jane Barnes and resided at Blount Street, Wilson. Informant was George Barnes, 710 Suggs Street, Wilson.

George Barnes died 6 June 1974 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 9 February 1891 to Wright Barnes and Jane Strickland; was married to Mary Dupree; was a retired laborer; and resided at 910 Wainwright Street, Wilson.

An approaching marriage.

Wilson Daily Times, 24 December 1938.

Mary Thelma Barnes, daughter of John M. and Annie Darden Barnes, in fact married Walter Byers, not Bias. Thelma Barnes Byers received degrees from Virginia State College in 1928 and Columbia University in 1941. The Byerses later relocated to Charlotte, where an elementary school still bears Walter G. Byers’ name.

I will not ask for much this year, because you can’t afford it.

At the dawn of the Great Depression, these children wrote letters to Santa Claus making modest requests for themselves and asking Saint Nick to remember their parents, siblings and teachers.

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Wilson Daily Times, 13 December 1930.