Barnes

The obituary of Viola Barnes Bernard.

Wilson Daily Times, 10 July 1943.

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In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: teamster Wesley Barnes, 32; wife Ella, 35; and children Joseph, 14, Lucy, 11, Sylvester, 7, Viola, 5, and Charley, 3.

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Norfolk & Southern Railroad, drayman West Barnes, 44; wife Ella, 47, laundress; and children Sylvester, 17, drayman, Viola, 15, cook, and Charlie, 13, wholesale store laborer; plus son-in-law James Watson, 23, drayman, wife Lucy, 22, cook, and children West, 4, and Lucy, 3 months.

Charles Barnes died 2 May 1917 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 6 February 1915 in Wilson County to Bert Hagans and Viola Barnes. The informant was Ella Barnes.

Henry Gray Barnes died 26 April 1932 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was 21 years old; lived at 401 North Vick Street; worked as a common laborer; was born in Wilson County to Jessie Ball of Warsaw, N.C., and Viola Barnes of Wilson; and was married to Alice Barnes. Informant was Ella Barnes, 401 North Vick. Cause of death: “Taken about 1 A.M. complaining he could not get his breath died about 7 A.M. No physician investigated since no sign of foul play.”

In the 1938 Richmond, Virginia, city directory: (possibly) Barnes Viola (c) dom h 110 E Clay; also Bernard Oscar L (c) hlpr h 10 E Marshall

In the 1939 Richmond, Virginia, City directory: Bernard Oscar L (c; Viola) hlpr h 217 E Clay

In the 1940 census of Richmond, Virginia: at 319 Brook Road, Oscar Bernard, 28, baker at bakery, and wife Viola, 26, cook at restaurant. 

In the 1941 Richmond, Virginia, City directory: Bernard Oscar (c; Viola) cook h 319 1/2 Brook Rd

In the 1942 Richmond, Virginia, City directory: Bernard Oscar (c; Viola) baker Whites h 319 1/2 Brook Rd

In 1942, Oscar Lee Bernard registered for the World War II draft in Richmond, Virginia. Per his registration card, he was born 25 December 1898 in Suffolk, Virginia; lived at 319 1/2 Brook Road, Richmond; his contact was Viola Bernard; and he worked for Whites Cafeteria, 513 E Grace Street, Richmond.

Viola Barnes died 8 July 1943 at her home at 401 North Vick Street, Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was 39 years old; was born in Wilson County to West Barnes of Wilson County and Ella Mercer of Edgecombe County; was single; and was buried in Rountree [probably, Vick] Cemetery. Lucy Watson was informant. 

Clipping courtesy of J. Robert Boykin III.

Private Frank Barnes has died.

Wilson Daily Times, 19 December 1919.

Ten Wilson County men named Frank Barnes registered for the World War I draft in 1917-1918; six were Black. One, born 2 April 1895, was the son of Andrew and Stella Williams Barnes. This Frank Barnes was severely injured during his service in France, but absolutely did not die of disease during the war.

This Frank Barnes’ service card shows he was discharged on 12 March 1919. He is listed with his family in the 1920 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County and, in fact, lived to 1981.

Who, then, was the Frank Barnes, son of Stella Barnes, who died while in service during World War I?

Clipping courtesy of J. Robert Boykin III; North Carolina World War I Service Cards, 1917-1919, http://www.ancestry.com.

302 Lane Street.

The one hundred-fifty-ninth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “#304 [sic]; ca. 1930; 1 story; two-room house with bungalow traits; late example of this traditional type.” The original house number was 207.

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In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: King Thomas (c; Henrietta) lab h 207 (302) Lane

Henrietta King died 11 February 1946 at 302 Lane Street. Per her death certificate, she was born 22 May 1897 in Edgecombe County, N.C, to Charles and Sophie Hines; was married to Thomas King; and was buried in Rountree [likely Vick] Cemetery.

Wilson Daily Times, 14 February 1946.

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: King Thos (c) lab h 302 Lane

Wilson Daily Times, 14 December 1961.

Photo by Lisa Y. Henderson, April 2022.

604 Viola Street.

The one hundred-fifty-eighth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1908; 1 story; extensively modified triple-A cottage; Masonite veneer.”

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On 20 July 1903, Sam Barnes and wife Ida Barnes borrowed $400 from Wilson Home and Loan Association, mortgaging a one-quarter acre lot on the south side of Viola Street adjoining Ann Bynum, William Hargrove, and Elder Phillips. The note was paid off and cancelled 27 May 1909. Deed Book 32, page 209.

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Samuel Barnes, 50, public drayman; sister Fannie, 27, cook; wife Ida, 45; and daughter Lurean, 21, school teacher.

In the 1925 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Barnes Saml (c) drayman 604 Viola

In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Barnes Saml (c; Ida) expmn h 604 Viola

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Barnes Saml (c; Ida) drayman 604 Viola h do [home ditto]

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 604 Viola, owned and valued at $3000, Sam Barnes, 56, public drayman; wife Ida, 52; and daughter Lorine, 29, teacher.

Samuel Barnes died 13 November 1933 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was about 65 years old; was born in Wilson to Alexander Barnes and Frances Stephens; was married to Ida Barnes; lived at 604 Viola; and worked in draying. Lurean Barnes, 604 Viola, was informant.

The 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory lists Ida Barnes, Earl Zachary, laborer; J. Nollie Zachary, barber at Walter S Hines, and Louise Zachary; and Lurean Zachary, teacher at Sallie Barbour School, at 604 Viola. [Louise appears to be a mistype for Lurean, whose husband was J. Knolly Zachary.]

Wilson Daily Times, 22 July 1946.

The 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory lists Ida Barnes, widow of Samuel Barnes; Joe K. Zachary, barber at Cherry Hotel, and Nolley Zachary, barber at Cherry Hotel, and wife Lurean Zachary at 604 Viola. [Joe K. Zachary was Joe Knolly (not Nolley) Zachary.]

Wilson Daily Times, 27 April 1953.

Ida Barnes died 26 April 1953 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 20 March 1874 in Wilson County to John Hinton and Margaret Matthew; was a widow; lived at 602 [sic] Viola. Daughter Lurean Zackery, 604 Viola, was informant. She was buried in Masonic Cemetery.

Wilson Daily Times, 28 May 1963.

Photo by Lisa Y. Henderson, April 2022.

Annie May Barnes pleads guilty to manslaughter.

Wilson Daily Times, 8 February 1924.

  • Annie May Barnes
  • Will Daniels
  • Young’s Line 
  • Mary Blue
  • Claude Sessoms — Claud Sessoms died 28 February 1931 at Mercy Hospital, Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was 86 years old; was born in Nash County, N.C., to Jim Sessoms and Chaney Sessoms; was married to Elizabeth Sessoms; lived near Elm City; and worked in farming. 

 

 

1111 Atlantic Street.

The one hundred-fifty-third in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1940; 1 story; bungalow with low hip roof, engaged porch, and distinctive block-stone facade.”

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1111 Atlantic Avenue, rented for $16/month, construction carpenter Matthew Barnes, 44; wife Ossie Mae, 30, presser for Fidelity Cleaners; mother Erma Grady, 66, widow, tobacco factory hanger.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Barnes Matthew (c; Ossie) carp h 1111 Atlantic Av

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Barnes Matthew (c; Ossie) carp h 1111 Atlantic Av

202 North East Street.

The one hundred-forty-seventh in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1930; 1 story; double shotgun with gable-end form and engaged porch.”

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Bullock Richd (c; Eva) gdnr h 202 N East. Also: Bullock Richd jr (c) h 202 N East

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 202 East Street, rented at $13/month, gardener Richard Bullock, 48; wife Eva, 25, cook; and [his] children Richard, 20, Moses, 16, George, 14, and Hellen Bullock, 13.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Ward Addie (c) cook h 202 N East. Also, Ward Elmer (c; 1) 202 N East.

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Monroe Eug (c; Annie M) tob wkr h 202 N East.

Eugene Monroe died 1 January 1953 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 10 March 1900 in Sumpter, South Carolina, to Ida White; was a tobacco factory worker; was married; and lived at 202 North East Street. Annie Mae Monroe was informant.

Annie Mae Monroe died 1 March 1960 at her home at 202 North East Street. Per her death certificate, she was born 5 September 1912 in Wilson County to Joseph Z. Taylor and Martha Ellis; was a widow; worked as a presser for Service Laundry; and lived at 202 North East Street. Mrs. Ossie Mae Barnes, 202 North East Street, was informant.

In early 1967, R.E. Townsend & Company Real Estate applied for a permit to renovate 202 North East Street. Property managers and sellers since 1898, Townsend once controlled scores of rental properties in East Wilson. Wilson Daily Times, 2 June 1967.

Ossie Taylor Barnes died 12 February 1970 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 4 July 1908 in Wilson County to Joseph Taylor and Martha [maiden name unknown]; resided at Dew’s Rest Home, with permanent address at 202 North East Street; and was a widow. Mrs. Ida Edmundson, 711 Suggs Street, was informant.

Photo by Lisa Y. Henderson, January 2022.