Vick

Studio shots, no. 27: Annie Washington Vick.

Annie M. Washington Vick (1871-1952).

In the 1870 census of Wilson township,Wilson County: blacksmith Jerry Washington, 42; wife Jane, 29; and children Georgiana, 14, Joshua, 12, William, 11, George H., 7, Andrew, 5, and Samuel, 2.

In the 1880 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: blacksmith Jerry Washington, 52; wife Jane, 40; and children George H., 17, works in blacksmith shop, Andrew, 14, Samuel, 12, Anna Maria, 8, Paul, 6, Sarah Jane, 3, and Mary Cathren, 11 months.

On 19 May 1892, Samuel H. Vick, 29, of Town of Wilson, son of Daniel and Fannie Vick, married Annie M. Washington, 22, of Town of Wilson, daughter of Jerry and Jane Washington. Alfred Robinson applied for the license, and Methodist minister J.F. Jordan and Presbyterian minister L.J. Melton performed the ceremony at the A.M.E. Zion church. Witnesses were Washington Suggs, C.H. Darden and B.R. Winstead.

In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: postmaster Samuel H. Vick, 37; wife Annie M., 28; and children Elba L., 17, and Daniel L., 3; plus cousin Bessie Parker, 15.

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: dealer in real estate Samuel Vick, 47; wife Annie, 38; and children Elma, 17, Daniel L., 13, Samuel E., 10, George, 7, Anna, 5, and Robert, 2.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Hines S. Vick, 62, real estate dealer; wife Annie M., 57; son Samuel H., 30, druggist; daughter Monte L., 11; and Alferd Robinson, 78, widower and lodger.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 622 East Green, Sam Vick, 77; wife Annie M., 70; sons Sam, 35, salesman for cosmetics house, and Robert, 28; son-in-law A.G. Walker, 40; daughter Doris Walker, 35; and grandchildren A.G., Jr., 5, and Joyce, 3. Both Walkers were teachers at Vick Elementary.

Daniel L. Vick registered for the World War II draft in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Per his registration card, he was born 2 February 1898 in Wilson, North Carolina; resided at 125 North 58th Street, Philadelphia; his contact was Mrs. Annie M. Vick, 622 East Green Street, Wilson; and he worked for John Wilds, 4035 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia.

Samuel Hiram Vick Jr. registered for the World War II draft in Wilson in 1942. Per his registration card, he was born 1 November 1900 in Wilson; resided at 622 East Green Street, Wilson; his contact was Mrs. Annie M. Vick, 622 East Green; and he worked for Martin Laboratory, 5111 Brown Street, Philadelphia, as a traveling salesman (“home every week-end.”)

Annie M. Vick died 20 August 1952 at her home at 622 East Green. Per her death certificate, she was 81 years old; a widow; a retired teacher; had been born in Wilson County to Jeremiah Washington and Jane (last name unknown); and was buried in Rountree cemetery. Monte Cowan was informant.

Photograph courtesy of Adventures in Faith: The Church at Prayer, Study and Service, the 100th anniversary commemorative booklet of Calvary Presbyterian Church.

Washingtonians feted.

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Pittsburgh Courier, 12 January 1929.

On 27 December 1928, Professor and Mrs. J.D. Reid threw a buffet lunch and whist party at their home at 600 East Green Street, which was followed by a dance at the Samuel H. Vick home at 622 East Green, all in honor of Irene and May Miller of Washington, D.C. [Who were the Miller sisters, and what was their Wilson connection?]

Thelma, J.D. Jr. and Frederick Reid were children of J.D. and Eleanor Frederick Reid. Robert and Samuel H. Vick Jr. were sons of Samuel and Annie Washington Vick.

The Samuel H. and Annie W. Vick family.

This handsome portrait captures members of the extended family of Samuel H. and Annie Washington Vick and appears to have been taken on the porch of their home at 622 East Green Street circa 1905. Vick is seated center left, looking off into the distance. The man and woman flanking him may be his parents, Daniel and Fannie Blount Vick. The boys are likely, from left, sons George White Vick (born 1902), Samuel W. Vick (1900), and Daniel L. Vick (1897). The little girl may be daughter Viola Vick, who was born after 1900 and died prior to the 1910 census. Eldest daughter Elba Louise Vick Valle (1893) may be the girl standing third from right. The men standing may be Samuel Vick’s brothers Ernest Linwood (1867), William Henry (1871), and James Oscar F. Vick (1872). The women standing are likely wives of the Vick brothers. Annie Vick appears to be the woman in the white blouse.

Photograph courtesy of booklet commemorating the dedication in 2013 of the Samuel H. Vick Historic Marker, sponsored by Wilson County Historical Association. Corrections to the identification of members of the Vick family are welcomed.

I certify to his high character.

When Lily-White Republican Senator Jeter C. Pritchard set out to oust postmaster Samuel H. Vick, who represented “the last vestige of negro office holders in the state,” a slew of prominent Wilson Democrats bucked convention to rally in Vick’s favor. Among the politicians, lawyers and businessmen supporting Vick was John H. Blount, whose letter of recommendation noted that Vick’s “mother and grandmother belonged to [his] father.”

The writer of this opinion piece mocks the Democrats who had once lamented Vick’s sinecure, “pictur[ing] how their dear wives and daughters were humiliated by having to transact all their postal business at Wilson with a negro postmaster and negro postal clerks.

peoples paper 12 10 1902

The People’s Paper (Charlotte, N.C.), 10 December 1902.

The white boy walked the plank.

Roanoke News, 8 May 1884.

James Edward O’Hara was elected to the United States House of Representatives from North Carolina’s Black Second district in 1882.

Daniel Vick was Samuel H. Vick‘s father. John H. Clark is generally credited with being Wilson’s first African-American mail carrier, but this brief article tells another story.

Lincoln U. students.

From the Catalogue of Lincoln University 1920-’21:

Sophomore class

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In the 1910 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: wagon factory laborer Willie Paulkin, 26, wife Pearl, 22, son Atric, 2, and brother Sam, 24, also a wagon factory laborer; plus Wash Joyner, 35, house painter, wife Sarah, 32, laundress, and son Alexander, 13.

In 1917, Alexander B. Joyner registered for the World War I draft in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Per his registration card, he was born 5 June 1896 in Wilson, North Carolina; resided at 616 Viola Street, Wilson; was single; and worked as a chair pusher for Shill Company in Atlantic City. He was described as medium height and build.

Alexander Barnes Joyner registered for the World War II draft in New York, New York, in 1942. Per his registration card, he was born 5 June 1896 in Wilson, North Carolina; resided at 249 West 139th Street, New York; his contact was “George Joyner (wife),” and he worked for the W.P.A., 70 Columbus Avenue, New York.

Freshman class

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In the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: postmaster Samuel H. Vick, 37; wife Annie M., 28; and children Elba L., 17, and Daniel L., 3; plus cousin Bessie Parker, 15.

In the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: dealer in real estate Samuel Vick, 47; wife Annie, 38; and children Elma, 17, Daniel L., 13, Samuel E., 10, George, 7, Anna, 5, and Robert, 2.

In 1918, Daniel Leon Vick registered for the World War I draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 2 February 1897 in Wilson; resided at 623 Green Street; his father was born in Nash County, North Carolina; he worked for S.H. Vick; and S.H. Vick was his nearest relative. He was described as short and medium build.

In the 1920 census of Washington, D.C.: at 1455 W Street N.W., North Carolina-born Daniel Vick, 22, boarded in the household of Charles L. Jones. He worked as an office building messenger.

Daniel L. Vick registered for the World War II draft in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Per his registration card, he was born 2 February 1898 in Wilson, North Carolina; resided at 125 North 58th Street, Philadelphia; his contact was Mrs. Annie M. Vick, 622 East Green Street, Wilson; and he worked for John Wilds, 4035 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia.

106 North Reid Street.

The twenty-fifth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for East Wilson Historic District: “ca. 1930; 2 stories; George White Vick House; Colonial Revival house with hip-roofed popular in district; wraparound porch with classical columns; fine example of the style; Vick was son of S.H. Vick, and operated taxi service.”

There is no listing for 106 North Reid in the 1930 census (or earlier); the house presumably was built shortly thereafter. In the 1930 Hill’s city directory of Wilson, there is a George W. White listed at the address. Is this a typographical error? Was George W. Vick actually the resident?  Other records suggest that he did not live in the house until after World War II.

On 23 October 1937, George White Vick, 32, son of Samuel and Annie Vick, married Blanche Curry, 25, daughter of Worth and Isabel Curry, in Nashville, Nash County.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1109 1/2 Washington Street, taxi driver George Vick, 34, and wife Blanche, 22, tobacco factory stemmer. At 106 North Reid: Ernest Jones, 34, tobacco factory truck driver; wife Nancy, 28, tobacco factory laborer; and sister Daisy Lindsey, 12; Ernest Barnes, 27, tobacco factory grader, and his wife Louvenia, 27, tobacco factory laborer; and Sylvester Page, 32. All three families rented rooms in the large house.

In 1942, George White Vick registered for the World War II draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 9 June 1903; resided at 1109 1/2 Washington Street; worked for Safety Taxi Company; and his nearest relative was Mrs. S.H. Vick of 622 East Green Street.

George White Vick died 24 June 1985 in Wilson.

Photograph by Lisa Y. Henderson, February 2017.

Sunday School at Calvary.

calvary Sunday SChool

This photograph, taken circa 1915, depicts Samuel H. Vick at left with Sunday School participants at Calvary Presbyterian Church. Four of his children — George W. (1903-1985), Irma (1905-1921), Robert E. (1908-2001), and Doris V. (1911-2010) — are among those gathered.

Photo courtesy of Freeman Roundhouse Museum, Wilson, and digitized here.

Darden funeral home and bicycle shop.

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Walter T. “Bud” Darden and Samuel H. and Annie Washington Vick‘s son, Daniel, also known as Bud, standing in front of Charles H. Darden & Son’s shop. In addition to providing funeral and undertaking services, the Dardens sold bicycles and Victor record players.

Image courtesy of City of Wilson Archives, reprinted in Wilson Daily Times, 15 February 2008.