theft

Watson charged with hog theft.

Wilson Times, 30 September 1910.

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  • Hayes Watson — in the 1920 census of Rocky Mount township, Edgecombe County, North Carolina: Hayes Watson, 49, ditcher; wife Lena, 32, laundress; and daughter Viola, 17, nurse.
  • Effie Battle — in the 1900 census of Wilson, Wilson County: drayman Turner Battle, 55; wife Effie, 46, “restaurant;” and children Cora, 21, cook, John, 11, Ernest, 9, Horace, 14, tobacco stemmer, and Mamie, 5.
  • Coot Robbins — on 18 March 1912, Coot Robbins, 29, married Hennie Harris, 27, in Wilson.
  • Ed. Holden — in the 1908 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Holden Edward (c) bricklyr  h 305 e Jones
  • Angelina Turner — in the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: on Jones Street, widow Angeline Turner, 35, cook; daughter Mary, 19; and grandchildren Leonard L., 6, and Annie, 3.
  • M.C. Daniel — probably, in the 1910 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Mac Daniel, 45; laborer at wholesale grocery; wife Fanny, 36; and children Thomas, 5, Annie, 4, Willie, 3, Jane, 2, and Beatrice, 5 months.
  • Frank Barnes
  • J.G. Coppedge — James G. Coppedge.
  • Cherry White 

Singers lose their clothes.

Wilson Daily Times, 2 June 1922.

Two unnamed African-American entertainers, described as “singers of note and the highest priced among their race,” were robbed of their wardrobes before a performance at the Globe Theatre. Booker Dew and Sylvester Jones were charged with the theft, and Gussie Davis, Marie Wallace, and Maggie Jefferson with receiving stolen goods. Globe owner Samuel H. Vick, Allen Armstrong, and Noah Tate appeared in court as witnesses.

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  • Booker Washington Dew — Booker T. Washington was a popular inspiration for names of African-American boys in the early 20th century. Almost universally, however, such children were named “Booker T.,” rather than “Booker W.” Thus, in the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 602 Stantonsburg Street, widow Maggie Dew, 48, and children Maggie, 21, Alfred, 18, T. Booker, 14, and Mildred, 3. Booker T. Dew died 22 May 1923. Per his death certificate, he was born 20 July 1905 in Wilson to Jackson Dew and Maggie Thompson; worked as a day laborer; and lived at 602 Stantonsburg Street. Maggie Belle Rutherford was informant.
  • Sylvester Jones
  • Gussie Davis
  • Marie Wallace
  • Maggie Jefferson — perhaps, in the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 607 Spring Street, carpenter John Jefferson, 68, and wife Maggie, 31. And/or, in the 1922 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Jefferson Maggie tobwkr 622 Wiggins
  • Samuel H. Vick
  • Allen Armstrong — in the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: public laborer Allen Armstrong, 35, and mother Ellen Armstrong, 70, widow, cook. [Both were described as born in Texas, but other records indicate the more likely North Carolina.]
  • Noah Tate

Theft by trickery.

Wilson Daily Times, 20 September 1945.

  • William Lee McMillan — perhaps: William Lee McMillian died 8 May 1957 at Mercy Hospital, Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 20 December 1884 in Robeson County, N.C., to Henry McMillian and Annie Willis; was the widower of Julia McMillan; lived at 708 Manchester Street, Wilson; and was a laborer.

Three men charged with stealing tobacco from Black farmer; selling it in town.

Wilson Daily Times, 7 September 1922. 

Tenant farmer Roscoe Pearson raised tobacco on Green Watson’s farm between Wilson and Kenly, a town at the edge of Johnston and Wilson Counties. He stored his crop in a packhouse near the road. Three white Johnston County men were accused of stealing his tobacco and selling it at Planters Warehouse in Wilson. A white Wilson policeman testified against the trio, asserting that one of them asked if he thought the matter would be dropped if they paid Watson (not Pearson) for the tobacco. 

  • Roscoe Pearson — I have found no record of Pearson in Wilson County.

Clipping courtesy of J. Robert Boykin III.

Farmer’s mare stolen.

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Wilson Advance, 21 June 1888.

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The 1900 census of Wilson County lists three men named Toby Farmer, any of whom might have been the man whose horse was stolen. (Though barber Tobias Farmer, who lived in town, is least likely.)

In Black Creek township: John Melton, 42, farmer; wife Lucy, 43; sons John, 15, and Samuel D., 3; stepson Johnson Farmer, 23; and father-in-law Tobious Farmer, 75, widower.

In Wilson township: Tobias Farmer, 70, wife Willie, 69, and son Warren, 48.

In Wilson town: day laborer Junius, 22, Rosa, 17, Freeda, 10, Robert, 7, Richard, 5, Mark, 2, and Ericker Farmer, 7 months, plus boarder Tobias Farmer, 48, barber.