Bullock

202 North East Street.

The one hundred-forty-seventh in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1930; 1 story; double shotgun with gable-end form and engaged porch.”

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Bullock Richd (c; Eva) gdnr h 202 N East. Also: Bullock Richd jr (c) h 202 N East

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 202 East Street, rented at $13/month, gardener Richard Bullock, 48; wife Eva, 25, cook; and [his] children Richard, 20, Moses, 16, George, 14, and Hellen Bullock, 13.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Ward Addie (c) cook h 202 N East. Also, Ward Elmer (c; 1) 202 N East.

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Monroe Eug (c; Annie M) tob wkr h 202 N East.

Eugene Monroe died 1 January 1953 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 10 March 1900 in Sumpter, South Carolina, to Ida White; was a tobacco factory worker; was married; and lived at 202 North East Street. Annie Mae Monroe was informant.

Annie Mae Monroe died 1 March 1960 at her home at 202 North East Street. Per her death certificate, she was born 5 September 1912 in Wilson County to Joseph Z. Taylor and Martha Ellis; was a widow; worked as a presser for Service Laundry; and lived at 202 North East Street. Mrs. Ossie Mae Barnes, 202 North East Street, was informant.

In early 1967, R.E. Townsend & Company Real Estate applied for a permit to renovate 202 North East Street. Property managers and sellers since 1898, Townsend once controlled scores of rental properties in East Wilson. Wilson Daily Times, 2 June 1967.

Ossie Taylor Barnes died 12 February 1970 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 4 July 1908 in Wilson County to Joseph Taylor and Martha [maiden name unknown]; resided at Dew’s Rest Home, with permanent address at 202 North East Street; and was a widow. Mrs. Ida Edmundson, 711 Suggs Street, was informant.

Photo by Lisa Y. Henderson, January 2022.

Henry Bullock found dead near ditch.

Wilson Daily Times, 10 April 1917.

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In the 1870 census of Rocky Mount township, Edgecombe County: Henry Bullock, 69; wife Patience, 65; and sons Harry, 21, and Turner, 18.

In the 1900 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: farmer Henry Bullock, 51; wife Martha, 45; and children Mary, 21, Lulla, 19, Hattie, 15, Elijah, 12, and John H., 10.

In the 1910 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: on Lipscomb Road, odd jobs laborer Henry Bullock, 51, and wife Martha, 49, laundress.

Henry Bulluck died 7 April 1917 in Wilson township, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was about 67 years old; was born in Edgecombe County to Henry Bullock and Patience Bullock; was married; and was engaged in ditching. Martha Bullock was informant. 

“Deceased was found dead in field near his work — probably heart failure.”

Clipping courtesy of J. Robert Boykin III.

 

Last will and testament of Nellie Bullock Whitehead.

When Nellie Bullock Whitehead made out her will on 10 November 1949, she was very clear that only her daughters Anna Whitehead Hagans and Elnora Whitehead Sauls would inherit.

Nellie Bullock Whitehead was a native of Wilson County; her husband John Whitehead was from Georgia. I have not found a marriage license for them, but they lived in Dodge County, Georgia, in 1910, and all their children were born in Georgia. By 1920, they had returned to live in Nellie Whitehead’s home county.

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In the 1910 census of Mullis township, Dodge County, Georgia: John Whitehead, 26; wife Nellie, 25; and sons Edmund, 7, and Will. H., 4.

In the 1920 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: on S.H. Crocker Farm Road, tenant farmer, John Whitehead, 37; wife Nellie, 36; children E.K., 16, William H., 13, Anna V.O., 7, Anna Nula, 5, and J.B., 4; and great-uncle[?] Josh Whitehead.

In the 1930 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: on Highway 91, express laborer [no first name] Whitehead, 49; wife Ella, 45; and children Anna V., 17, Nora, 16, John, 14, and William, 24. All were born in Georgia except Ella [Nellie], who was born in North Carolina.

John Whitehead died in Wilson on 24 October 1937. Per his death certificate, he was 55 years old; was born in Georgia to Joshua Whitehead and Georgian Melvin; was married to Nellie Whitehead; lived at 1513 Nash Street; and worked as a meat packer.

In the 1940 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: widow Nellie Whitehead, 56; son J.B., 24, truck driver for a contractor; daughter Anna Hagans, 27, tobacco company stemmer; son-in-law Henry Hagans, 32, town garbage remover; and daughter Elnora Whitehead, 26.

John Baptist Whitehead registered for the World War II draft in Wilson in 1940. Per his registration card, he was born 25 December 1915 in Chester, Georgia; lived at Route 4, Box 39, Wilson; worked for Imperial Tobacco, Barnes Street; and his contact was his mother, Nellie Whitehead.

Nellie B. Whitehead died 27 March 1951 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 10 August 1884 in Elm City, N.C., to Equia B. Bullock and William Ann Barnes and was a widow. Anna B. Hagans was informant.

Black businesses, 1913, no. 5: City Baking Company.

A three-page Wilson Times insert published about 1914 highlighting the town’s “progressive colored citizens” featured City Bakery, then located at 540 East Nash Street, “under Odd Fellows Hall,” with R.B. Bullock as proprietor.

The bakery had a predecessor though, as shown in the 1912 city directory:

Hill’s Wilson, N.C., City Directory (1912).

Sanborn fire insurance map, Wilson, N.C., 1913.

This detail from the 1913 Sanborn map shows the location of the oven in the back of the small brick “bake house.” In 1914, City Bakery boasted that its premises were “sanitary in ever particular.” Such a claim must have been difficult to make when it sat within feet of multiple rail lines. 

  • Richard Bulluck — Bulluck is listed in the 1912 directory living at 412 South Lodge Street.
  • Alex Henderson — perhaps, Sandy Henderson.
  • William Kittrell

Three killed in auto-train collision.

Wilson Daily Times, 11 June 1926.

After the car she was in collided with a train in Dunn, North Carolina, Bessie Manning of Wilson was rushed to the Atlantic Coast Line hospital in Rocky Mount, but died of her injuries. Tom Mingo died at the scene, and Viola Bullock at the A.C.L. hospital. Both were also Wilson residents.

Manning’s death certificate, filed in Nash County, does not reflect her residency in Wilson. However, her son Paul Kirk filed for letters of administration for her estate in Wilson County, estimating its value at $2500.

Clipping courtesy of J. Robert Boykin III. Thank you!

Pitt County’s oldest citizen.

More about Cromwell Bullock, known as “Crummell,” who lived at various times in the areas of Wilson, Edgecombe and Pitt Counties between the towns of Saratoga and Fountain.

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Greenville News, 23 April 1919.

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Some notes:

  • Plymouth is in Washington County, North Carolina, east of Wilson County near the coast.
  • The 1860 slave schedule of Edgecombe County, North Carolina, lists Joshua K. Bullock as the owner of 50 enslaved people, including a 40 year-old male described as mulatto who might have been Cromwell.
  • Cromwell Bullock and Charity Farmer were married, though not legally, well prior to Emancipation. In 1866, they recorded their 17-year cohabitation in Wilson County.
  • The farm he purchased was likely in far southeastern Edgecombe County, near the Pitt County border. (I need to search further for a definitive location.)
  • Polly Wooten was Cromwell Bullock’s third wife. He was married briefly to a woman named Fannie between his first wife’s death in 1893 and his marriage to Polly in 1903.
  • I have only been able to identify ten children: John Bullock, Nathaniel Bullock, Cromwell Bullock Jr.Caroline Bullock Moore James White, Milly Bullock Scarborough, Peter Bullock, Harry Bullock, Jesse Bullock, Dempsey Bullock, and Leah Bullock Moore.

Studio shots, no. 154: Cromwell and Charity Farmer Bullock.

[A reader has identified the woman and man in the photo originally posted here as her great-grandparents, Thomas and Frances Applewhite Artis, not Cromwell and Charity Bullock. I have removed the photo for this reason. — L.Y.H., 21 January 2021.]

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In 1866, Cromwell Bullock and Charity Farmer registered their 17-year marriage with a Wilson County justice of the peace.

In the 1870 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: farm laborer Crummell Bullock, 49; wife Charity, 45, farm laborer; and children Nathaniel, 14, Crummell, 12, Caroline, 9, Milly, 6, Peter, 4, and Harry, 2.

In the 1880 census of Auters Creek township, Edgecombe County: Crumell Bullock, 62, farmer; wife Charity, 49; and children Crumell Jr., 22, Carolina, 19, Milly, 17, Peter, 13, Harry, 11, Jessie, 9, Dempsy, 7, and Leer, 5.

Per her grave marker, Charity Bullock was born 12 January 1833 and died 26 December 1893. She was buried in Bullock family cemetery in Edgecombe County.

In the 1900 census of Otter Creek township, Edgecombe County: farmer Cromwell Bullock, 70; wife Fanner, 57; and stepchildren Priscilla, 19, and Benny, 17.

On 3 June 1903, Crummel Bullock, 70, of Edgecombe County, married Polly Wootten, 55, of Saratoga township, daughter of Reuben [illegible] and Gatsey Moore, in Saratoga township, Wilson County.

Cromwell Bullock made out his will in Edgecombe County on 29 October 1907. Per its terms: (1) to wife Pollie, the cleared land of the Pollie Edwards tract and permission to use all the wood and lightwood off that tract; ten barrels of corn; a cart and gear; a set of farming tools; a horse and buggy; 1000 pounds of fodder; 200 pounds of wheat; a sow and pigs; three still chairs; kitchen furniture; tubs, buckets, wash and dinner pots; (2) to children Cromwell Bullock, Millie Scarborough, John Bullock, Nathan Bullock, and Lea Moore, $50 each; to granddaughter Charity Edwards, $25; to children Peter Bullock, Jesse Bullock, Dempsey Bullock and Caroline James, all his real estate, and son Harry Bullock to have the house in which Henry and Lea Moore were living; (3) all moneys for minor heirs to be deposited in Wilson Savings Bank until child reaches age twenty.

In the 1910 census of Otter Creek township, Edgecombe County: on Fountain Road, Cromwell Bullock, 84, and wife Poly, 54. Cromwell reported that he had been married three times.

On 9 February 1910, Harry C. Bullock, 43, of Edgecombe County, son of Cromwell and Charity Bullock, married Ida Vines, 24, of Edgecombe County, daughter of Jesse and Matilda Carney, at the Edgecombe County Courthouse.

On 6 October 1919, in Pitt County, Cromwell Bullock prepared a codicil to his will to note that his children had already been deeded the tracts of land set forth in the earlier document.

In the 1920 census of Otter Creek township, Edgecombe County: Crumwell Bullock, 105, and wife Pollie, 88.

Cromwell Bullock died 26 January 1920 in Township No. 9, Edgecombe County. Per his death certificate, he was born in 1815; was married to Polly Bullock; and was born in Plymouth, N.C. Peter Bullock was informant.

Polly Bullock died 2 February 1920 in Township No. 9, Edgecombe County. Per her death certificate, she was about 80 years old; was married to Crumwell Bullock; was a farmer’s wife; and was born in Edgecombe County to Howell and Gatsey Moore. Dempsey Bullock was informant.

Peter Bullock died 30 April 1938 in Township No. 9, Edgecombe County. Per his death certificate, he was born 1874 in Wilson County to Cromwell Bullock and Charity Farmer, both born in Wilson County [the Bullocks lived in the area where Wilson, Edgecombe and Pitt Counties meet near the town of Fountain, and their various birth places and residences are attributed to all three counties]; was married to Fannie Bullock; was a farmer; and was buried in Bullock cemetery.

Harry Bullock died 4 November 1942 in Township No., 9, Edgecombe County. Per his death certificate, he was born 16 April 1873 in Wilson County to Cromrall Bullock and Charity Farmer, both born in Edgecombe County; was single; and was buried in Bullock cemetery.

Dempsey Bullock died 18 November 1946 in Gardners township, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was born 9 April 1873 in Pitt County to Cromwell Bullock and Chariety [last name unknown], both born in Pitt County; was married to Marina McNair Bullock; was a farmer; and was buried in Bullock cemetery near Fountain, N.C. Informant was Carlas Bullock, Stantonsburg.

Photo courtesy of Ancestry.com user algorham1.

I have no men to send for them.

Though Wilson is a few miles closer to Rocky Mount, Wilson County was under the jurisdiction of the Goldsboro field office of the Freedmen’s Bureau. The people of northeastern Wilson County — the area around Elm City — were closely tied to southeastern Nash and southwestern Edgecombe Counties, and many families moved frequently across county lines for work and family.

In this letter, William Cox, the assistant superintendent at the Rocky Mount field office referred a matter to Goldsboro. In a nutshell: father and son Spencer and Churchwell Bullock signed a labor contract with James J. Taylor of Joyners Depot (now Elm City) in Wilson County. However, the Bullocks had left Taylor’s employ to work for E. Ferrell in “this county” (either Edgecombe or Nash County, Rocky Mount straddles the county line and Joyners Depot was close to both). Cox had no staff to spare to go out and round up the Bullocks and, in any case, because Taylor’s farm was in Wilson County and the contract therefore was approved by the Goldsboro F.O., the problem was not his.

Freedmen’s Bureau, Rocky Mount April 25th, 1866.

Captain Geo. O Glavis, U.S.A., Asst. Supt. Bureau of R.F. and A.L., Goldsboro, N.C.

Captain:

I have the honor to request that two freedmen, Spencer Bullock, and Church Bullock, his son, who have entered into a written contract with Mr. Jas. J. Taylor of Wilson County, and who have left him, The contract is approved by You, The freedmen are now living in this County, on the plantation of E. Ferrell Near Joiners Depot in this County, I have no men to send for them, and as the contract was drawn up in Your County, and as Mr. Taylor lives in Wilson County, I have referred the case to you,

I am, Captain,

Very respectfully, William F. Cox, 2d Lieut. and Asst. Supt.

P.S. I suppose the reason why Mr. Taylor did not go to you is that freedmen are in this county. W.F. Cox

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In the 1870 census of Tarboro township, Wilson County: farm laborer Spencer Bullock, 56; wife Mathilda, 53; and children Georgewell [Churchwell], 17, Emeline, 9, Leda, 8, and Louisia, 3.

North Carolina Freedmen’s Bureau Field Office Records, 1863-1872, Rocky Mount (assistant superintendent), Roll 55, Letters Received Dec 1865-Aug 1868, http://www.familysearch.org