Photographs

Wedding scenes.

Capture.JPG

Pittsburgh Courier, 3 January 1942.

Robert E. Vick, son of Samuel H. and Annie Washington Vick, was a groomsman in the Atlanta wedding of Alice Clarissa Clement, whose father was president of Atlanta University, and Robert Joseph Foster of Monroe, Louisiana. Vick is seated bottom right in the right-hand photograph.

Many thanks to S.M. Stevens for the referral.

504 South Lodge Street.

This house is not within the bounds of East Wilson Historic District. However, South Lodge Street — below the warehouse district — has been an African-American residential area since the turn of the twentieth century.

IMG_2906

In the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 506 [sic] Lodge Street, cafe proprietor Jessie Strickland, 28, and wife Viola, 27, and roomers Mack Strickland, 18, transfer truck driver, and James Johnson, 20, guano company laborer.

In the 1922 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Strickland Jesse (c; Viola) propr Strickland Cafe h 504 S Lodge

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 504 Lodge Street, owned and valued at $4000, Jesse Strickland, 46, and wife Viola, 37. Their occupations are listed as farm laborer and “manufacturing [illegible]/own plant.” However, it appears that entries are off by a line, and should read “manufacturing [illegible]/own plant” and cook for private family.

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Strickland Jesse (c; Viola) 504 S Lodge

In a familiar tale of woe, the Stricklands defaulted on their mortgage, and Wilson Home & Loan Association advertised the property for auction.

Wilson Daily Times, 10 November 1930.

Jessie Strickland died 18 March 1932 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was 40 years old; was born in Wilson to Mose Farmer and Hannah Strickland; was a clerk in a store; and lived at Spring Street. Informant was Viola Strickland, 504 South Lodge.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Mable Annie (c) maid h 504 S Lodge

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Mable Annie (c) h 504 S Lodge

Photograph by Lisa Y. Henderson, December 2017.

Studio shots, no. 90: Edna E. Gaston.

Per an eBay listing for a reproduction of this photo: “Photo. North Carolina. Black girl and doll carriage. The girl’s name is Edna Earl Gaston. She was the niece of John Clark who was a founder of St Mark’s Episcopal Church. He was also the first Black mail carrier in Wilson, North Carolina. 1925.”

In fact, Edna Earline Gaston was the daughter of Albert Sessle Gaston of Wilson and Annie House Gaston of Moore County, North Carolina. John H. Clark was her great-uncle, brother of Albert Gaston’s mother Ella Clark Gaston.

——

In the 1900 census of Town of Wilson, Wilson County: Ella Gaston, 30, divorced, with sons Ralph, 10, and Albert, 2. [Also in the 1900 census of Town of Wilson, Wilson township, North Carolina: 44 year-old barber John Gaston, [second] wife Sabrina [Sattena] 22, and children Theodore, 13, Cicero, 10, George, 8, and Caroline, 2 months. John A. Gaston was Albert Gaston’s father.]

In 1918, Albert Gaston registered for the World War I draft in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Per his registration card, he was born 16 August 1897 in Wilson, N.C.; resided at 2105 Nassau Street, Philadelphia; worked as a longshoreman; and his nearest relative was Anna Gaston.

In the 1920 census of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania: at 2105 Nassau Street, building laborer Albert Gaston, 22; wife Anne T., 23; daughter Edna E., 1;  lodger Harry Jenkins, 19, a laundry laborer; and “mother” Hellen Hunton, 53. All were born in North Carolina.

Shortly after the census, the Gastons returned to North Carolina, where they took positions in Annie H. Gaston’s home county. On 28 April 1921, The Moore County News of Carthage printed principal Albert Gaston’s address to the Shady Grove colored school.

By October 1921, Gaston had take over as head of the struggling Addor school. Per this 1997 National Register of Historic Places nomination report, the Gastons began an energetic campaign to raise money for a Rosenwald School, and the Lincoln Park school near Pinebluff was the result.

Albert Sessel Gaston registered for the World War II draft in 1942 in Raeford, Hoke County, North Carolina. Per his registration card, he was born 15 August 1897 in Wilson; was employed by the Board of Education in Raeford; and his contact was Annie L. Gaston, 119 Lincoln Street, Hampton, Virginia.

Annie Lillian Gaston died 2 June 1952 at Mercy Hospital in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 17 July 1896 in Moore County to John House and Maggie Gunter; was a schoolteacher; and was married. Albert Gaston was informant.

Per the Social Security Death Index, Albert Gaston died November 1979 and Edna Gaston Coles died 25 July 1999, both in Philadelphia.

Studio shots, no. 89: the Mobley family.

I posted the obituary of Jane Rountree Mobley here.

Her great-great-granddaughter, Carolyn Maye, has graciously shared these photographs of Jane Mobley’s descendants, many of whom moved into Edgecombe and Pitt Counties in the early years of the 20th century.

FB_IMG_1515215348674.jpg

Rhoda Mobley Barnes

In the 1880 census of Wilson, Wilson County: farm worker John Mobley, 35; wife Jane, 28; and children Rhoda, 9, Henrietta, 6, Jane, 5, Isaac, 4, and John H., 1.

On 13 January 1889, Ben Barnes, 42, of Wilson township, married Rhoda Mobley, 21, of Toisnot township, on F.A. Woodard’s plantation in Wilson township. Primitive Baptist minister Samuel Burston performed the ceremony in the presence of Harry Sharp, Dennis Bynum and Mike Barefoot.

Rhoda Barnes died 1 June 1951 in Macclesfield, Edgecombe County. Per her death certificate, she was born 1 October 1854 [actually, about 20 years later] in Wilson County to John Mobley and Jane [maiden name unknown]; was a widow; and was buried in Harrell cemetery near Crisp, North Carolina. Mattie Howard was informant.

FB_IMG_1515215343065.jpg

Benjamin Barnes

Ben Barnes died 19 April 1935 on Amanda Pitts’ farm in Edgecombe County. Per his death certificate, he was born 12 December 1835 in Wilson County to Isaac Barnes and Julia [maiden name not given]; was married to Rhoda Barnes; was buried at Harrell cemetery. Informant was Jessie Barnes.

Martha Lee Roberson Maye (1932-2014), daughter of Willie and Annie Barnes Roberson, at age 7 and shortly before her death.

Mattie Barnes Howard (1905-1977), daughter of Rhoda and Ben Barnes.

A tobacco thief is caught.

201809081734568793.jpg

Wilson Daily Times, 21 August 1933.

  • Robert Artis — in the 1930 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: farmer Robert Artis, 46; wife Malindy, 31; children Adam, 17, James, 28, Edgar L., 13, Luciea, 13, Christirene, 12, Georgia, 10, and Noah, 9; step-sons Hesicar, 8, and Eugenia, 6; children Lizzie, 4, Richard, 2, and Minnie B., 9 months; and mother-in-law Henrietta [Artis?], age illegible.
  • Walter Leach

Richard C. Artis and father Robert E. Artis, circa 1950s. Photo courtesy of Melissa Mack.

413 East Green Street.

The seventy-ninth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

IMG_2909.jpg

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this house is: “ca. 1893; 1 story; Zachariah Barnes house; two-room house; aluminum-sided; Barnes was a porter.” The house was formerly numbered #414.

In the 1912 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Barnes Zachariah porter 414 E Green

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: office maid Mary Palmer, 50, and her children Beatrice, 23, private cook; James E., 18, drugstore delivery boy; Glayds, 14, private nurse; Mary L., 12, private nurse; Lonie, 9; and Robert L., 8.

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Palmer Mary (c) janitress h 413 E Green; Palmer Beatrice (c) domestic 413 E Green; and Palmer Edw (c) porter Turlington & Morrison h 413 E Green

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 413 East Green, rented at $15/month, Georgia-born household servant Isaac Butler, 44; wife Estelle, a household servant; and lodger Eleanor Deans, 38, also a household servant.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Russell Julia (c) cook h 413 E Green

In the 1947-48 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Lee John W (c; Irene) orderly Woodard-Herring Hosp h 413 E Green

On 16 September 1986, the Wilson Daily Times ran an obituary for Lula B. Collins, who had last lived at 413 East Green:

612 South Lodge Street.

This duplex is not within the bounds of East Wilson Historic District. However, South Lodge Street — below the warehouse district — has been an African-American residential area since the turn of the twentieth century.

IMG_2904.JPG

In the 1925 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Williams Luvie (c) lab 612 S Lodge

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: Case Benton (c; Beatrice) lab h 612 S Lodge

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: at 612 South Lodge, rented for $20/month, street sweeper Bynum Case, 38, and wife Beatrice, 35, laundress.

In 1931, realtor D.S. Boykin advertised the sale of 612 South Lodge, with its “one, four-room dwelling” on a 55′ x 100′ lot, pursuant to Louvie Williams’ default on a mortgage he obtained just two years earlier (before the collapse of the American economy that signaled the Great Depression.)

Wilson Daily Times, 4 March 1931.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 612 Lodge, two families renting at $8/month each, lumber mill laborer James Simpson, 33, wife Frances, 32, and son James Lewis, 11, and building construction laborer Henry Romey McQuen, 39, wife Pearlina, 31, and daughter Lee Winstead McQuen, 10. The McQueens were born in South Carolina.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: McQueen Henry R (c; Pearline L; 1) tob wkr h 612 S Lodge

In 1942, Henry Rommie McQueen registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Jones Leona (c) tob wkr h 612 S Lodge and Dawson Eliz (c) tob h 612 S Lodge

Eighteen years later, the address was home to Joseph Hall, who died 3 May 1965.

Wilson Daily Times, 7 May 1965.

Photograph by Lisa Y. Henderson, February 2018.

Frank Barnes, seaman.

Frank Barnes applied for a Seaman’s Protection Certificate in August 1917. American seamen carried the document as proof of citizenship in foreign ports. Per his application, Barnes was born 22 January 1895 in Wilson, North Carolina; was not literate; and had been employed since 1915 as a fireman on the S.S. Mauretania en route from New York to France.

41383_2421401574_0559-00320.jpg

Per his description, Barnes was 5’3″, 125 pounds, with brown eyes and black hair and a scar over his right temple. He resided at 1 Doyers Street, New York. [Doyers is a tiny elbow of a lane off The Bowery in Chinatown, and #1 is now home to Tasty Hand-Pulled Noodles Inc.]

Screen Shot 2018-08-21 at 2.41.49 PM.png

Howard Adams, above, and William Smith and Fredrick Woods, below, gave affidavits to establish Barnes’ identification.

Screen Shot 2018-08-21 at 2.42.19 PM.png

Screen Shot 2018-08-21 at 2.42.47 PM.png

The customs collector testified to Barnes’ citizenship.

Screen Shot 2018-08-21 at 2.43.20 PM.png

In December 1917, Frank Barnes himself attested that he was born in Wilson in 1894 and that his father Frank Barnes “(probably)” or “believes he was born in” the United States. Barnes had lived in Wilson until 1915 when he began to work in shipping. He had recently worked on three ships: the S.S. Orduna from 1 July to 19 July 1917; the S.S. Carmenia from 26 August to 11 September 1917; and the S.S. Anglo Saxon, 14 November to 14 December 1917.

Screen Shot 2018-08-21 at 2.44.42 PM.png

Barnes received his identification in December 1917 in Bordeaux, France.

Screen Shot 2018-08-21 at 2.46.14 PM.png

Detail of the certificate:

Screen Shot 2018-08-21 at 2.47.27 PM.png

Close-ups of Frank Barnes’ photographs:

Screen Shot 2018-08-21 at 3.26.03 PM.png

Screen Shot 2018-08-21 at 3.27.07 PM.png

Another photo from Barnes’ 1918 application for a protection certificate:

Screen Shot 2018-08-21 at 3.51.33 PM.png

U.S. Applications for Seaman’s Protection Certificates, 1916-1940 [database on-line], http://www.ancestry.com; original document at Application for Seaman’s Protection Certificates, 1916-1940, Records of the Bureau of Marine Inspection and Navigation, 1774-1982, Record Group 41, National Archives, Washington, D.C.