Photographs

1205 Queen Street.

The sixty-eighth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District:  “ca. 1922; 1 story; bungalow with clipped-gable roof; aluminum sided.”

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In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., City Directory: Farmer Richard (c; Bessie) lab h 1205 Queen

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1205 Queen, rented for $12/month, divorced laundress Bessie Farmer, 27; and children Richard Jr., 10, Kary, 8, and Albert, 4; and brother James Farmer, age illegible.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: owned and valued at $1600, widowed cook Allie McNair, 40; son Linwood, 20, odd jobs at municipal building; and daughter Madeline, 18, nurse. Allie was born in Pitt County, and her children in Washington County. [The McNairs apparently moved to Wilson after the death of Luther McNair in Plymouth, Washington County, on 23 May 1930.]

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., City Directory: McNair Allie (c) cook h 1205 Queen

Photograph by Lisa Y. Henderson, April 2018.

Studio shots, no. 42: the Neal and Nellie S. Handy family.

Neal and Nellie Southerland Handy with children Alexander, Robert Lee and Susanna Handy, circa 1926.

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In the 1920 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: on Black Creek Road, Neal Handy, 33, farmer; wife Nellie, 27; and children Susanna, 7, and Bubber, 4.

In the 1930 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: brickmason Neal Handy, 40; wife Nellie, unknown age; children Susanna, 16, Alexander, 15, and Robert Lee, 5; and brother Archie, 22, laborer.

Jarvis Sherrod, 24, of Wilson, son of Solomon and Josephine Sherrod, married Susanna Handy, 21, of Wilson, daughter of Neil and Nellie Handy, in Wilson in October 1933. Missionary Baptist minister R.A. Murphy performed the ceremony at the bride’s home in the presence of Nellie Handy, Leonard Sherrod and Doretta Davis.

In the 1940 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: on Raleigh Road, bricklayer on school projects Neal Handy, 52; wife Nellie S., 42; and son Robert L., 15.

Nellie Handy died 22 November 1941 in Wilson County. Per her death certificate, she was 40 years old; married to Neal Handy; and born in Robeson County to Eli Sutherland and Annie Barnes.

Robert Lee Handy died 2 February 1953 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 18 March 1925 to Neil Handy and Nellie Southerland; was single; and worked as a chauffeur.

Neil Alexander Handy died 7 March 1967 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 30 June 1888 in South Carolina to George Handy and Mary Murphy; resided at 108 Manchester Street; and was a brickmason. Alexander Handy was informant.

Alexander Handy Jr. died 18 April 1987 in Durham, North Carolina. Per his death certificate, he was born 20 August 1914 in Robeson County, North Carolina, to Neil Handy and Nellie Sutton; was married to Daisy Woodard; resided at 108 Manchester Street, Wilson; and worked as a brickmason.

Susanna Handy Sherrod Carmichael (1913-1991).

Susanna Handy Carmichael died 21 December 1991 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 30 March 1913 in Robeson County to Neil Handy and Nellie Southerland; resided at 704 Edwards Street, Wilson; worked as a housemaid; and was married to James A. Carmichael.

Photographs courtesy of Ancestry.com user JeffreyMcLean5046.

The Saunders brothers.

The family of Bennie and Nathaniel Saunders paid tribute to them in Calvary Presbyterian Church‘s centennial anniversary booklet.

Bennie Saunders (1894-1980).

Nathaniel Saunders (1914-1991).

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In the 1900 census of Elm City, Toisnot township, Wilson County: fireman Branch Saunders, 41; wife Polly, 24, washerwoman; and sons Isah, 8, Bennie, 5, and Paul B., 1.

In the 1910 census of Dry Well township, Nash County, North Carolina: lumber mill laborer Branch Sanders, 50; wife Polly, 38; sons Isaah 17, and Benjamin, 16, both Lumber mill laborers, Paul B., 11, Marcus H., 9, and Richard T., 6; plus five boarders, all lumber mill laborers.

In the 1920 census of Dry Well township, Nash County: on Opossum Road, lumber mill engineer Branch Sanders, 60; wife Polly, 42; and sons Bennie, 24, and Mark, 18, both lumber mill laborers, Richard, 16, and Nathaniel, 6.

On 30 October 1927, Bennie Sanders, 30, of Wilson, son of Branch and Pollie Sanders, married Nannie Farmer, 36, of Wilson, daughter of Tom and Senora Farmer. Presbyterian minister A.H. George performed the service in the presence of Vicia Thompson, Lula Bunn and Janie Diamonds, all of Wilson.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 916 Washington Street, owned and valued at $2500, body plant laborer Benjamin Saunders, 36; wife Mamie, 43; father Branch, 71; and brother Nathaniel, 16.

In 1940, Nathaniel Saunders registered for the World War II draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 2 December 1914 in Middlesex, North Carolina; resided at 102 North East Street, Wilson; his contact was Mrs. Nathaniel Saunders; and he worked for T.A. Loving Company, Goldsboro, North Carolina.

Purchase option for nine areas just south of town.

In 1909, Daniel C. Suggs gave attorney Sidney A. Woodard a $3600 purchase option on nine-acre lot just outside town limits adjacent to the Wilmington & Weldon and Norfolk & Southern railroads. The option included the grant of a right of way for construction of a railroad siding “beginning at the second or third telegraph pole from Floyd Bynum’s house” to run through the property.

The description suggests that the nine acres was located in the lowest quadrant of the X formed by the railroads just below Contentnea Guano Company, as shown in this detail from the 1913 Sanborn fire insurance map of Wilson.

Here is the area today, per Google Maps:

Men’s Civic Club, no. 2.

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This photo, titled “An Early Picture of the Men’s Civic Club,” is in the collection of Wilson’s Freeman Round House Museum. The Civic Club was founded in 1939 to address “the problems and needs (civic, educational and recreational) of the Negroes of greater Wilson — city and county.” The photo probably dates from around 1950. I can only partially name the men depicted. Standing are an unidentified man; Episcopalian priest Rev. Robert J. Johnson; Baptist minister Rev. Fred M. Davis; and an unidentified man. Seated are Camillus L. Darden; an unidentified man; Presbyterian minister Rev. Obra J. Hawkins; and Charles Darden James.

If you can help identify any of these men, please contact me. Thank you.

1013 East Nash Street.

The sixty-sixth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District: “ca. 1913; 1 story; Graham [sic] Reid house; Queen Anne cottage with intact wraparound porch and classical columns; fine local example of the type.”

The 1922 Sanborn fire insurance map shows that the porch did not originally wrap around the east side of the house:

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In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1013 East Nash Street, owned and valued at $3000, taxi chauffeur Jake Barnes, 563; wife Effie, 32; and children Douglass, 20, shoeshop cobbler, Waylone, 19, taxi chauffeur, Eva, 16, Mattie, 13, and Nellie, 10.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1013 East Nash Street, Willie Reid, 36, and wife Ada, 31. Willie reported that he had been living in Fremont [Wayne County] in 1935 and owned a barber shop. Ada was a teacher at “Farmer’s School.”

Willie Gorham Reid registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County in 1942. Per his registration card, he resided at 1013 East Nash Street; was born 12 August 1903 in Wayne County; his contact person was Mary Artist, 1013 East Nash; and he was a self-employed barber working on Main Street, Black Creek.

Willie Ghorum Reid died 28 February 1963 at Mercy Hospital in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 12 August 1902 in Wayne County to William Reid and Bettie Wilson; was married to Ada Reid; resided at 1013 East Nash; and was a barber at William Hines Barber Shop.

Photograph by Lisa Y. Henderson, April 2017.

The land formerly owned by Orrin Best.

Wilson Daily Times, 5 October 1928.

Here’s the plat of Orren and Hancy Best‘s former Grab Neck property mentioned in the notice of sale, with lots 12 and 13 clearly marked:

Here is the current landscape, showing that five houses sit on the 11 platted lots facing Cone between West Nash and West Vance.

Lots 12 and 13 (and a sliver of 11) are now 111 Cone Street North, a four-bedroom Colonial Revival cottage built circa 1928.

Photos courtesy of Google Maps.