The sales of Will, Anna, Dilsey, Ned, Dicey, Teresa, Guilford, Moll, Judah, and Bill.

I finally undertook a page-by-page examination of Wilson County’s earliest deed books to look for evidence of the sale, trade, or transfer of enslaved people. I found plenty.

  • On 27 June 1857, for $1200, P.L. Barnes of Wayne County, N.C., sold John Revels of Wilson County “one negro a boy Named Will & aged about twenty two years,” guaranteed “to be sound in mind & body & free from constitutional diseases or defects.” Deed Book 1, page 284, Wilson County Register of Deeds Office.
  • On 28 October 1856, J. Nelson Bone of Nash County conveyed to his daughter Rhoda Mercer [of Oldfields, Wilson County] “a negro woman by the name of Anna which was 16 years old the 7th day of last May.” Deed Book 1, page 227, Wilson Register of Deeds Office. [In the 1860 slave schedule of Wilson County, Rhoda Mercer’s husband Thomas Mercer is listed with two enslaved people — an 18 year-old female and a one year-old male, both described as “black” (i.e. dark-skinned.) This was likely Anna and her child.]
  • On 14 January 1858, for $450, Elisha Barnes of Wilson County sold Cader Rountree of Wilson County “one certain negro girl slave named Delsey about six years old.” Deed Book 1, page 334, Wilson County Register of Deeds Office. [A month later, on 22 February 1858, Cader Rountree drafted a will leaving his wife Crissy Rountree a life interest in “one Negro girl named Delcy.”

From Will of Cader Rountree, Wilson County, 1858.

  • On 28 April 1858, for $775, David Harrel of Wilson County sold James Barnes of Wilson County “one slave a negro boy named Ned and aged Ten years,” guaranteed “to be of sound mind and body & free from constitutional diseases or defects.” Deed Book 1, page 383, Wilson County Register of Deeds Office.
  • On 3 February 1859, for $6555, David Taylor of Wilson County sold R.J. Taylor of Wilson County slaves Dicey, Teresa, Guilford, Mary (Moll), Judah, and William (Bill),  Deed Book 1, page 392, Wilson County Register of Deeds Office.

One comment

  1. My, my, my. Lord, forgive them for they knew not that your instruction has always been freedom and not oppression.

Leave a Reply