Wilson Chapel burns.

Wilson Chapel Free Will Baptist Church‘s building burned to the ground in an early morning fire in November 1922.

In 1915, the church had bought a wooden structure first used by Jackson Chapel Missionary Baptist and vacated after its merger with First Missionary Baptist and the erection of the large brick building still standing at the corner of Pender and East Nash. This wooden building is apparently the one destroyed by fire in 1922. The church rebuilt, and the new building is shown here. In 1958, Wilson Chapel built the brick building in use today.

Wilson Daily Times, 6 November 1922.

Wilson Daily Times, 7 November 1922.

The 1922 Sanborn fire insurance map shows the close proximity of Wilson Chapel and the cotton seed house of Wilson County Gin Company.

Clippings courtesy of J. Robert Boykin III.

Underwood brothers struck by a car.

Wilson Daily Times, 6 November 1917.

A drunk driver struck a light pole then careened into two boys standing near the intersection of Nash Street and Stantonsburg Road (now Pender Street) in Wilson. Though seriously injured, both recovered under the care of doctors at Wilson’s Black hospital.

  • Dr. Gilliam — Matthew S. Gilliam.
  • Dr. Hargrave — Frank S. Hargrave.
  • Herman and Eddie Underwood Jr. — in the 1920 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 663 Nash Street, farm operator Edd Underwood, 45; wife Ophelia, 29; and sons Edd Jr., 9, and Herman, 5.

Clipping courtesy of J. Robert Boykin III.

1200 East Hines Street.

The one hundred thirty-ninth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1930; 1 story; bungalow with engaged gable-roofed [sic; it is shed-roofed] porch and heavy square porch posts on brick piers; asbestos veneer.”

The address of this house was 1200 Wainwright Avenue prior to the extension of Hines Street in the early 1970s.

——

In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Haskins Damp (c; Sudie B) driver 1200 Wainwright av; Haskins Estelle (c) dom 1200 Wainwright; Haskins Hester (c) h 1200 Wainwright

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Haskins Hester (c) h 1200 Wainwright

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1200 Wainwright, valued at $1700, Coca-Cola Plant laborer Damp Haskins, 24; wife Sudie B., 21; children Damp Jr., 2, and Hellen, 6 months; mother Hester, 72; brother Joseph, 18; sister Martha Pitt, 52, servant; and nephew Jim R. Haskins, 10.

In 1940, Johnnie Hagans registered for the World War I draft in Wilson. Per his registration card, he was born 26 June 1917 in Wilson; was unemployed; lived at 1200 Wainwright Street; and his contact was mother Mamie Hagans

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Hagan Jas (c) lab 1200 S Wainwright av;  Hagan Mamie (c) farmer 1200 S Wainwright av; Hagan Sarah (c) tob wkr 1200 Wainwright av

In the 1947 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Price Louis (c; Nellie) farmer h 1200 S Wainwright av

Wilson Daily Times, 9 July 1948.

Louis Price died 23 August 1948 at his home at 1200 Wainwright Avenue, Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 2 June 1903 in Harnett County, N.C., to Walter Price and Amy McNeil; and was buried in Smith Grove, Dunn, N.C.

Wilson Daily Times, 19 June 1962. 

[Personal sidenote: During my childhood, 1200 Wainwright was the home of William and Mable Tyson Foreman. My sister and I spent many happy hours playing with their three grandchildren, our “play cousins,” on their visits from Washington, D.C.]

Photo by Lisa Y. Henderson, November 2021. 

The death of Mariah Dunston Talley.

Wilson Daily Times, 18 November 1913.

——

In the 1900 census of #12 Township, Cabarrus County, North Carolina: at Scotia Seminary, Mariah Dunston, 19, student.

In the 1910 census of High Point, Guilford County, North Carolina: at 102 Beaman Street, Marshall A. Tally, 32, state Sunday School missionary; wife Mariah E., 29; daughter Marshalle O., 21 months; and son “Baby,” 3 months.

Marshall Lee Tally died 28 April 1913 in Wilson, of measles. Per her birth certificate, she was born 3 March 1908, and was 4 years, 11 months old. She lived at 110 Pender Street. The informant, Dr. Frank S. Hargrave (or his proxy) did not spend much effort filling out the rest of the form, describing her mother as unknown and the birthplace of her father, Rev. M.A. Tally, as unknown.

Mariah E. Talley died 18 November 1913 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 9 September 1880 in Wake County to Calvin W. Dunston and Mary A. Mathews; was married; and lived at 201 Pender. M.A. Talley was informant. She was buried in Raleigh, N.C., [at Mount Hope Cemetery.]

Rev. Talley was remarried two years later to Fannie C. Anthony of Weldon, N.C.

Clipping courtesy of J. Robert Boykin III.

Snaps, no. 93: Claude and Fannie Kent Patterson.

Screen Shot 2020-06-10 at 8.26.09 AM

——

In the 1910 census of Clayton township, Johnston County, North Carolina: farm laborer Fisher Patterson, 36; wife Minnie B., 28; and children John L., 7, Claudius, 3, and Clee, 7 months; father Chester Patterson, 79; and nephew William Patterson, 9.

In the 1910 census of Cross Roads township, Wilson County: farmer Joseph Kent, 28; wife Minnie, 22; daughter Fannie, 1; and sister-in-law Rosa Bailey, 18.

In the 1920 census of Springhill township, Wilson County: Joe Kent, 38, farmer; wife Minnie, 30; and children Fannie, 11, Lillie, 9, Joe, 7, Elbert, 5, Ellic, 3, and Pauline, 5 months.

In the 1920 census of Clayton township, Johnston County: farmer Fisher Patterson, 49; wife Minnie, 39; children Leamon, 17, Claude, 14, Cleatho, 10, and Rubin, 4; sister India Cooper, 38, widow; and nephew Bill Cooper, 10.

On 22 December 1928, Claudie Patterson, 21, of Springhill township, married Fannie Kent, 20, of Springhill township, in Wilson.

In the 1930 census of Springhill township, Wilson County: farmer Claud Patterson, 22; wife Fannie, 21; and daughter Layeruth, 1.

In the 1940 census of Springhill township, Wilson County: farmer Claude Patterson, 33; wife Fannie, 31; and children Ruth, 11, L.O., 6, Minnie, 5, and Alberta, 2.

In 1940, Claude Patterson registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 1 August 1906 in Johnston County, N.C.; lived at R.F.D. #3, Kenly, Wilson County; his contact was wife Fannie Patterson; and he worked for Thelma Barnes, Kenly, Wilson County.

Claude Patterson died in 1984; Fannie K. Patterson died 26 May 2003.

Photograph courtesy of Bernard Patterson.

Look! The first colored fair!

Wilson Daily Times, 10 November 1920.

“It will be up-to-date in every way. Exhibits of every kind, good racing, good riders, good speaking, good shows, good midway, good free attractions, in fact, everything that it takes to make a good fair!”

  • Hon. Robert H. Terrell
  • Prof. E.J. Hayes — Edgar J. Hayes, superintendent of Wilson’s colored graded schools.
  • F.E. Edwards — Frank E. Edwards died 17 February 1931 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was 57 years old; was born in Wayne County to King and Eliza Edwards; was married to Addie Edwards; lived at 426 Spring Street; and worked as a house mover.
  • W.M. Phillips — William H. Phillips, dentist.

Clipping courtesy of J. Robert Boykin III.

1010 Wainwright Avenue.

For reasons that are not clear to me, the 1000 block of Wainwright Avenue is not included in the  East Wilson Historic District, though this house and others on the block date to the 1920s and ’30s.  

——

In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory, 1010 Wainwright was vacant.

In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1010 Wainwright, rented for $15/month, Grover Jackson, 48, odd jobs laborer, born in Alabama; wife Hattie, 30, servant; stepdaughters Bertha Reese, 15, Sarah E. Reese, 12, and Billie Roberson, 9, and stepson Samuel Farmer, 9.

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Jackson Grover (c; Hattie) lab h 1010 Wainwright Av

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1010 Wainwright, owned and valued at $750, Calvin Swinson, 41; wife Alice, 35; and children Jessie, 15, Calvin, 12, Earlean, 11, Horace, 9, Soisetta, 6, and Charles, 2.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Swinson Calvin (c; Alice; 6) orderly h 1010 Wainwright Av

In 1942, Calvin Swinson registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 6 June 1898 in Greene County, N.C.; lived at 1010 Wainwright; his contact was [father-in-law] Wesley Jones, 901 Stantonsburg Street, Wilson; and he worked for Woodard-Herring Hospital.

In 1945, Calvin Swinson Jr. registered for the World War II draft in Wilson County. Per his registration card, he was born 11 June 1927 in Wilson; lived at 1010 Wainwright; his contact was Calvin Swinson; and he was a student at Darden High School.

Wilson Daily Times, 15 September 1948.

Wilson Daily Times, 9 August 1950.