Month: November 2020

Ernest L. Artis Jr., Atlantic City ’45, Lincoln ’49.

The Herald, the yearbook of Atlantic City High School, Atlantic City, N.J., 1945.

Born in Wilson in 1928, Ernest Lee Artis Jr. and his parents Ernest and Louise Artis joined the Great Migration during the early years of the Depression.

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On 13 June 1923, Ernest Artis, 21, of Fountain, son of Joe and Ella Artis, married Louise McNair, 18, of Plymouth, N.C., daughter of Rufus and Louise McNair, at Louise McNair’s resident at Plymouth, Washington County, N.C.

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Artis Ernest L (c; Louise) (Service Barber Shop), h 404 N Vick

In the 1940 census of Atlantic City, Atlantic County, New Jersey: at 700 Ohio Avenue, Ernest Artis, 36, barber; wife Louise, 35, storekeeper; and son Ernest, 12. All were born in North Carolina.

Ernest Lee Artis registered for the World War II draft in Atlantic City in 1946. Per his registration card, he was 27 September 1905 in Wilson County, N.C.; lived at 720 North Ohio Avenue, Atlantic City; his contact was wife Louise Artis; and he was self-employed at 135 North Penn, Atlantic City.

Ernest Artis Jr. registered for the World War II draft in Atlantic City in 1946. Per his registration card, he was born 2 January 1928 in Wilson, N.C.; lived at 720 North Ohio Avenue; his contact was friend Anna Butler, 705 North Ohio; and he was a student at Lincoln University in Oxford, Pennsylvania.

The Lion, the yearbook of Lincoln University, 1949.

Hurt in an odd accident.

Wilson Daily Times, 16 February 1929.

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  • Henry Holloway  

On 23 October 1897, Henry Holiway, 23, of Crossroads township, son of Anson Canady and Maggie Wiggins, married Millie Purvies, 19, Crossroads township, daughter of J.K. and Mary Purvies, at Poney Renfrow‘s tenant house of Crossroads township.  

In the 1900 census of Crossroads township, Wilson County: farmer Henry Holiway, 25; wife Millie, 23; and children Amos, 7, and Cora Lee, 1 month.

In the 1920 census of Springhill township, Wilson County: on Buck Horn and Kenly Branch Road, farmer Henry Holloway, 47; wife Millie, 45; and children Mattie, 17, Beatrice, 14, Pearline, 12, Narcissus, 9, and Elizabeth, 6.

In the 1928 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Holloway Henry (c; Millie) lab h 908 Mercer

In the 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Holloway Henry (c; Millie) lab h 908 Mercer

In 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 704 Warren Street, tobacco factory sweeper Henry Holloway, 67; wife Millie, 60; and grandchildren Cora Lee, 13, and James, 9.

Henry Holloway died 16 December 1966 at his home at 903 Mercer Street, Wilson. He was born 5 August 1871 in Durham, N.C., to Maggie [no last name listed]; and was a laborer. 

  • Rev. LeRoy Pearce

Rev. LeRoy R. Pearce died 15 December 1961 in Rich Square, Northampton County, N.C. Per his death certificate, he was born in 9 October 1884 in Fayetteville, N.C., to Rufus and Mary Pearce, and was a minister. 

The resting place of Cornelius Barnes.

After reading about Cornelius Barnes, Officer Jose A. Rivera Jr. visited Bethel cemetery to look for his grave. Officer Rivera and the Stantonsburg Police Department have taken an interest in the upkeep of this historic graveyard, and he sent this photo this morning. (The marker was carved by the fine folk artist and stonecutter Clarence B. Best.)

Thank you!

Happy Thanksgiving!

My aunt married into a big family, and my parents, sister, and I were often absorbed into the Barneses’ big holiday gatherings. Especially Thanksgiving. I’m not sure why I remember this one exactly, but I was about 9 or 10, I think, and Aunt Pet was hostess. At the time she was living in this house at 1112 Carolina Street, down the street from our old house. Coats heaped on a bed, folding tables pressed end to end from one room into the next, pots steaming, plates groaning. 

2020 has been terrible in so many ways, but though there will be no big family gathering, I am mindful of the grace extended to me even in this year. I am thankful for my life and all in it, and grateful to the ancestors who guide my steps. 

Snaps, no. 75: Cornelius Barnes.

Cornelius Barnes (1875-1960).

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In the 1880 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: farmer Richard Barnes, 38; wife Aqulla, 33; and children Edward C., 9, Wm. H.M., 8, Lewis H., 6, Maryland, 5, and Corneleous, 4.

In the 1900 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: farmer Richard Barnes, 58; wife Gracey, 23; children Peter, 23, Cornelius, 21, Mary S., 18, Geneva, 16, John, 14, and Barnie, 7.

On 27 December 1905, Cornelius Barnes, 29, of Stantonsburg, son of Richard and Quilla Barnes, married Maggie Farmer, 22, of Stantonsburg, daughter of Robert and R. Farmer, near Moyeton, N.C. 

In the 1910 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: Melia Barnes, 33; wife Maggie, 27; and children Clarance, 6, and Cellia, 3.

In the 1920 census of Stantonsburg township, Wilson County: on Stantonsburg & Wilson Road, tenant farmer Nela Barnes, 43; wife Maggie, 35; children Sallie, 13, and Claranc, 16, and nieces and nephew LouEtta, 17, Walter, 16, Flora, 10, Quillie, 8, and Susan A., 5.

In the 1930 census of Saratoga township, Wilson County: Neal Barnes, 55; wife Maggie, 45; and nieces Mary S., 16, and Quillie, 18.

In the 1940 census of Black Creek township, Wilson County: Cornelius Barnes, 64; wife Maggie, 55; daughter Sallie, 33; nephew Frank Ellis, 29; and grandchildren Herman Bowden, 12, and Thelma, 9, Corana, 8, William, 5, Josephine, 4, and Dorothy Taylor, 3. 

Cornelius Barnes died 27 June 1960 in Stantonsburg township, Wilson County. Per his death certificate, he was born 3 March 1875 in Wilson County to Richard Barnes and Quilla Joyner; had been a farmer; and was married to Maggie Barnes. He was buried in Bethel cemetery.

Photograph courtesy of Ancestry.com user wepurkett.

A suit for seduction.

The Indianapolis Journal, 28 January 1896.

A suit alleging seduction claimed a tort action under the law. Here, Nathan Blackwell, acting in the place of deceased Edwin Blackwell, filed to recover damages for the seduction by Walter Kersey of his niece (or cousin?) Mary Ella Blackwell, a minor. (I do not know if their “relationship” was consensual or forced, but it likely resulted in a pregnancy.) Kersey, like the Blackwells, was a migrant to Indianapolis from Wilson County and was about twenty years Mary Ella’s senior.

A year later, Mary Ella married a man three times her age.  On 27 January 1897, Mary Ella Blackwell, 17, born in North Carolina to Edwin and H. Blackwell, married Thomas Parsons, 50, born in North Carolina to Jefferson Parsons and Zilphia Burns, in Indianapolis.

But the relationship did not last: in the 1910 census of Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana: Hattie Blackwell, 43, widowed laundress, and children Mary, 29, divorced laundress, and John, 23, coal yards worker, single. All were born in North Carolina.