Author: Lisa Y. Henderson

Researcher -- and descendant -- of North Carolina's free people of color. See also my genealogy blog at www.scuffalong.com and www.afamwilsonnc.com, which documents the African-American history of Wilson County NC.

The Harts’ resting place.

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A photograph does not do justice to these unique matching headstones in Rest Haven cemetery. The inset is etched black glass. Tempie Ann Hart‘s shows a regularity that suggests it was machine-made. Ben Hart‘s, however, with its pointed-tail 9’s and serifed 7’s, bears the unmistakable imprint of craftsman Clarence B. Best. Though the insets have cracked, their lettering still darkly gleams in sunlight.

——

In the 1870 census of Walnut Creek township, Edgecombe County: farmer Wiley Hart, 47; wife Chaney, 33; and children Susan, 13, James, 12, Lucius, 11 (described as “idiotic”), Wiley, 5, and Benjamin, 3.

In the 1880 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: farmer Willie Hart, 57; wife Chaney, 43; children Susan, 24, James, 23, Willie, 15, Ben, 13, Epsy, 8, and Tildy, 6; and nephew Willie Killebrew, 15. Willie and Chaney reported suffering from dysentery.

In the 1880 census of Old Fields township, Wilson County: Stephen T. Jones, 25; wife Fortune, 22; and daughters Susan, 4, and Tempy A., 2.

Ben Hart, 31, son of Wiley Hart and Chaney Hart, married Tempy Joyner, 20, daughter of Forten Joyner, on 6 June 1900 in Toisnot township, Wilson County.

In the 1900 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: farm laborer Benjamin Hart, 32; wife Tempy, 25; children Hattie, 5, and Grover, 2; grandchildren [niece and nephews] Edwin, 17, George, 12, and Chaney, 11; and grandmother [mother] Chaney Hart, 65.

In the 1910 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: on Wells Daws Avenue, Benjamin Heart, 43; wife Tempy, 33; children John L., 8, Willie B., 6, Dicy A., 5, Mattie, 3, and George, 1; wife’s children Hattie, 13, and Grover Johnson, 10; nephew Dallis Locus, 11; and mother Chanie Heart, 73.

In the 1920 census of Toisnot township, Wilson County: on Wilson-Tarboro Road, farmer Ben Hardt, 50; wife Tempy, 45; children John L., 18, Willie, 16, Dicie, 14, Mattie, 12, George, 10, Mary, 8, and Effie, 4. Next door, Grover Hart, 21, wife Mammie, 21, and son William, 1.

In the 1930 census of Wilson township, Wilson County: farmer Ben Hart, 63; wife Tempie, 51; and children George, 21, Effie, 15, and [grandson] Ben Jr., 7.

In the 1940 census of Gardners township, Wilson County: farmer Ben Hart, 70; wife Tempie, 62; nephew Aaron Hinnant, 18; son-in-law Ernest Parker, 23; daughter Effie, 24; and granddaughter Elouise, 6.

Tempie A. Hart died 9 July 1940 in Wilson township. Per her death certificate, she was 57 years old; was born in Wilson County to Steve Jones and Forneighny Jones; and was married to Ben Hart.

Ben Hart died 7 November 1951 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 20 March 1881 in Edgecombe County to Wiley Hart; was a widower; resided at 1200 Washington Street, Wilson. Informant was Rev. J.L. Hart, 1200 Washington Street.

Willie Brown Hart died 2 April 1956 in Portsmouth, Virginia. Per his death certificate, he was born 3 January 1906 in North Carolina to Ben Hart and Tempie Ann Jones; was married; and worked as a janitor at City Treading Plant. Informant was George Hart, 104 North Reid Street.

Grover Lee Hart died 1 November 1958 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 3 August 1898 in Wilson County to Ben Hart Sr. and Tempie Ann Jones; was engaged in farming; lived in Elm City; and was married to Mamie Hart.

Hattie Pitt died 12 June 1962 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 29 January 1897 in Wilson County to Ben Hart and Tempie A. Jones; she was a widow; and she resided at 1306 Washington Street. Mrs. Festee Cotton, 1306 Washington, was informant.

John L. Hart died 6 February 1963 at Mercy Hospital. Per his death certificate, he was born 28 January 1901 in Wilson County to Benjamin Hart and Temie Ann Jones; was a minister; lived at 1200 Washington Street; and was married to Elouise Hart.

George Hart died 30 September 1971 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born 6 February 1911 to Ben Hart and Tempie Jones; worked as a cabdriver; resided at 104 North Reid, Wilson; and was married to Lutoria Hinnant Hart.

Photograph by Lisa Y. Henderson, February 2018.

Where we worked, 1922: H and I.

City directories offer fine-grained looks at a city’s residents at short intervals. The 1922 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., directory reveals the types of work available to African-Americans during the booming tobacco era. This post is the seventh in an alphabetical series listing all “colored” directory entries for whom an occupation was listed. The address is the resident’s home, unless a business address is noted.

  • Hadley, Hattie, laundress, 607 East Nash
  • Hagan, Cora, tobacco worker, 1205 Carolina
  • Hagan, Dicey, domestic, 212 South East
  • Hagan, Henry, laborer, 404 Spring Street Alley
  • Hagan, Isaac, laborer, 409 Young’s Alley
  • Hagan, John, farmer, 212 South East
  • Hagan, Jonah, cook, 1205 Carolina
  • Hagan, May, laundress, 409 Young’s Alley
  • Hall, Bettie, tobacco worker, 901 Atlanta
  • Hall, Chester, tobacco worker, 404 Spring Street Alley
  • Hall, Jerre H., carpenter, 901 Atlanta [Atlantic]
  • Hall, Luther, dairyman, 408 Whitley
  • Hall, Purley, orderly — Wilson Sanatorium [see below]
  • Hall, Rosa, laundress, 212 East Hines
  • Hall, Victoria, maid, 125 Ashe
  • Hanesworth, Charles, tobacco worker, 203 Stantonsburg Road
  • Haney, Essie, tobacco worker, 313 Stantonsburg Road
  • Haney, Minnie, tobacco worker, 313 Stantonsburg Road
  • Haney, Rufus, tobacco worker, 313 Stantonsburg Road
  • Haney, Sing, tobacco worker, 313 Stantonsburg Road
  • Hardy, Carrie, laundress, 209 South Reid
  • Hardy, Cornelius, tobacco worker, 209 South Reid
  • Hargrave, Frank S., physician, 624 East Green
  • Hargrave, Willie, domestic, 605 East Green
  • Hargraves, Donald, barber, 1110 Carolina
  • Hargraves, Duncan, carpenter, 1110 Carolina
  • Hargrove, Elias S., Rev., 803 Viola
  • Harper, Charles, carpenter, 1106 East Nash
  • Harper, Luicinda, domestic, 1106 East Nash
  • Harrell, Charles T., bricklayer, 503 Railroad
  • Harrell, Grady, bellman, 411 East Green
  • Harrell, Thomas, laborer, 802 South Lodge
  • Harrington, Edward, section hand, 412 East Jones
  • Harrington, Sarah, laundress, 514 East Nash
  • Harris, Alus, grocer, 1009 Carolina, 1007 Carolina
  • Harris, Bessie, laundress, 411 Young’s Alley
  • Harris, David, laborer, 411 Young’s Alley
  • Harris, Emma, tobacco worker, 208 East Hines
  • Harris, George, laborer, 613 Stantonsburg Road
  • Harris, Henry, bricklayer, 208 East Hines
  • Harris, James, laborer, 208 East Hines
  • Harris, James, tobacco worker, 407 East Walnut
  • Harris, John, tobacco worker, 208 Manchester
  • Harris, Pearl, cook, 703 East Nash
  • Harrison, Lillie, cook, 531 Smith
  • Harrison, Zeke, laborer, 117 Manchester
  • Harvey, Love, barber, 114 East Barnes, 410 East Walnut
  • Harvey, Roscoe L., barber – Love Harvey, 410 East Walnut
  • Haskins, Annie, laundress, 404 South Daniel
  • Haskins, Gertrude, laundress, 508 Warren
  • Haskins, James, porter, 530 East Barnes
  • Haskins, Lester, tobacco worker, 404 South Daniel
  • Haskins, Martha, cook, 505 West Nash
  • Haskins, Robert, bottler, 508 Warren
  • Haskins, Sarah, laundress, 507 Hadley
  • Hatcher, Thomas, bricklayer, 1002 Mercer
  • Hawkins, George, laborer, 902 Viola
  • Hawkins, Otha, bricklayer, 307 Elba
  • Hawkins, Robert, factory hand, 215 East Spruce
  • Hayes, Edward J., principal – Stantonsburg Street Public School 613 East Green
  • Hayes, Ella, laundress, 505 Railroad
  • Hedgepeth, Fannie, laundress, 310 East Walnut
  • Hedgepeth, Jennie, cook, 104 Ashe
  • Hennett, Henry, tobacco worker, 402 Spring Street Alley
  • Henry, Daniel, laborer, 407 East Green
  • Henry, Robert, bricklayer, 141 East Bank[s]
  • Herring, Amos, laborer, 705 South Lodge
  • Herring, Arthur, farmer, 616 Railroad
  • Herring, Ella, laundress, 616 Railroad
  • Herring, Jane, tobacco worker, 616 Railroad
  • Herring, Jesse, laborer, 416 Whitley
  • Herring, Mattie, domestic, 616 Railroad
  • Hicks, Dolly, attendant – Dr. M.E. DuBrisette [DuBissette], East Green extended
  • Higgins, Martha, laundress, 910 East Nash
  • Highsmith, Neal, barber – The Mayflower, 717 Viola
  • Highsmith, William J., barber – W.M. Hines, 802 East Vance
  • Hill, Anna, cook, 306 Pender
  • Hill, Edward, plasterer, 308 North Reid
  • Hill, Henrietta, maid, 205 Pender
  • Hill, James A., laborer, 610 Railroad
  • Hill, John, tobacco worker, 610 Railroad
  • Hill, Joseph, carpenter, 117 Ashe
  • Hill, Lillie, tobacco worker, 610 Railroad
  • Hill, Lula, domestic, 631 Wiggins
  • Hill, Maude, laundress, 117 Ashe
  • Hines, Allie, laundress, 631 Suggs
  • Hines, Amos, fish [market?], 609 Stantonsburg Road
  • Hines, Amos, fish, 631 Suggs
  • Hines, Charles, grocer E Nash extended, 643 Wiggins
  • Hines, George, porter, 631 Suggs
  • Hines, Harvey, laborer, 631 Suggs
  • Hines, Henry, laborer, 404 South Goldsboro
  • Hines, John, laborer, 502 South Daniel
  • Hines, Mary, tobacco worker, 504 Grace
  • Hines, Robert, helper, 546 East Nash
  • Hines, Sarah, laundress, 631 Suggs
  • Hines, Sylvester, machinist, 409 Viola
  • Hines, Walter S., barber 215 East Nash, 617 East Green
  • Hines, William M., barber 113 South Tarboro, 615 East Green
  • Hinnant, Annie, domestic, 903 Stantonsburg Road
  • Hinnant, Arthur, laborer, 903 Stantonsburg Road
  • Hinnant, Cora, domestic, 903 Stantonsburg Road
  • Hinnant, Edward, soft drinks 825 Stantonsburg Road, 903 Stantonsburg Road
  • Hinnant, Edwin L., cashier city clerk, 301 Whitehead Avenue
  • Hinnant, Frank, porter — Dildy & Agnew, Pender corner Viola
  • Hinton, Hardy, cooper, 817 Mercer
  • Hinton, Maggie, maid, 107 South Carroll
  • Hinton, Massie, cook, 107 South Carroll
  • Hinton, Matthew, plasterer, 603 South Lodge
  • Hinton, Moses, laborer 516 Smith
  • Hinton, Ola, laundress, 516 Smith
  • Hocutt, Ella, domestic, 616 Darden Alley
  • Hodge, Frank, driver, 520 Carroll
  • Hodge, Harriet, laundress, 520 Carroll
  • Hodge, Isaac, tobacco worker, 407 East Green
  • Hodge, Rena, domestic, 109 North East
  • Horn, Arthur, laborer, 406 Spring Street Alley
  • Horne, Missouri, laundress — Wilson Sanatorium, 214 Manchester
  • Hoskin, Joseph, tobacco worker, 524 East Barnes
  • Hotel Lynnhaven, 537 East Nash, Gertrude Adams proprietor
  • Howard, Ada, domestic, 402 Whitley
  • Howard, Charles, tobacco worker, Bank near Goldsboro
  • Howard, John, fireman, 701 South Spring
  • Howard, Lula, domestic, 906 Atlanta
  • Howard, Walter, laborer, 902 East Nash
  • Howell, Annie, domestic, 304 North East
  • Howell, Howard, laborer, 304 North East
  • Howell, William, laborer, 525 Stemmery
  • Huggins, Mary, tobacco worker, 611 Gay
  • Humphrey, Edward D., cooper, 707 South Goldsboro
  • Hunt, Linn, helper, 510 Railroad
  • Hunter, Annie, tobacco worker, 402 South Bruton
  • Hunter, Edward, bottler, 1201 Washington Avenue
  • Hunter, Lossie, maid, 1201 Washington Avenue
  • Hurst, William M., cook – A.M. Lewis, 908 Atlantic
  • Hussey, Florence, laundress, 707 East Nash
  • Hutchins, Levi, tobacco worker, 513 Warren
  • Hutchins, Tillie, domestic, 513 Warren
  • Hyman, Bessie, domestic, 600 South Daniel
  • Hyman, James, tobacco worker, 905 Robinson
  • Hyman, Lea, domestic, 414 Whitley
  • Hyman, Louvenia, domestic, 600 South Daniel
  • Hyman, Samuel, butler, 600 South Daniel
  • Ideal Pharmacy, 557 East Nash, D.C. Yancey proprietor
  • Ingram, Edward, laborer 505 South Mercer
  • Ingram, Jessie, cook, 111 North Rountree
  • Isam, Roy, laborer, 604 South Daniel

Notes:

  • Asterisk notwithstanding, Edwin Hinnant was certainly not “colored,” and was likely deeply unhappy to find himself so designated in the city directory.
  • The Hotel Lynnhaven was located where Artis’ Barbershop later stood for several decades.

At right, the old Wilson Sanatorium Annex in October 2018. Its marquee is just visible above the roof of the adjacent building.

 

Anatomy of a photograph: East Nash Street.

This rare postcard depicts an equally rare image of East Wilson’s early business district in the 500 block of East Nash Street. Close examination of the photograph reveals fascinating details, many of which help date the image. The photographer set up his camera near the curb (a surprising feature!) on the south side of the street. First Missionary Baptist Church, built in 1913, would have been across from and slightly behind him. On the far horizon looms the brick bulk of the Hotel Cherry, built in 1917.

At least ten people — all of whom appear to be male — were captured in the image, including these seven standing or walking along the right side of the street:

These commercial buildings supply clues to the location of the photo. The three-story building, constructed in 1894, is Odd Fellows Hall, home to Hannibal Lodge #1552. Its ground floor contained an ever-changing array of store fronts, and a sign for Maynard’s Market/Fish & Oysters is visible here. As early as 1914, Samuel Vick‘s Globe vaudeville and moving picture theatre was housed on the second floor. The sign hanging from the corner of the building pointed the way to the theatre’s side entrance.

The three-story frame building beside the Odd Fellows Hall was the Hotel Union, managed by Mary Jane Sutzer Taylor Henderson. Here lies a clue to the photograph’s date. In the 1908 and 1913 Sanborn fire insurance maps, there is an empty lot between the Union and the hall.

1908.

1913.

However, by 1922, a one-story wooden structure, housing a barber shop and sharing a wall with the hotel/boarding house, appears in the gap. See below. (Note also that the theatre’s exterior staircase is gone, traded for enclosed access.) This building, with its shallow gable-end roof, is visible in the postcard image.

1922.

The Model T Fords (and a single mule and wagon) also help date the photo to the early 1920s.

There is an artificial quality about the neatly trimmed hedges and suspiciously uniform trees ranged along the left side of the street. Though this portion of the image may have been hand-drawn, that side of the 500 block was in fact lined with private homes.

Families living in this block included the Mitchells, (#540), the Sutzers (#536), and the Yanceys (#538).

This stretch of East Nash Street today, courtesy of Google Maps. The commercial buildings on the right side of the street, including the historic Odd Fellows Hall, were demolished in the 1990s.

Postcard image courtesy of J. Robert Boykin III, Historic Wilson in Vintage Postcards (2003).

Detail.

I have written here of 303 Elba Street, a small L-plan cottage a few steps off East Green Street. Built before 1908, it is among the oldest surviving houses in the East Wilson Historic District, though its days are clearly numbered.  Their names are lost to time, but the carpenters that built this house by hand were almost certainly African-American, drawn from Wilson’s tiny pool of talented craftsmen.

A peek into the house, now abandoned, reveals few original details, but the ones that remain speak to the attention paid to the aesthetics of even working-class housing. The fireplace surround — simple trim molding on the mantel shelf and across the header and, on the mantel legs, double brackets atop delicate spindles. The pleasant asymmetry of the door’s five floating panels.

[My family spent three decades in this house, opening and closing this door times innumerable, resting an elbow or laying a piece of mail on this mantel.]

Photograph by Lisa Y. Henderson.

1114 and 1114 1/2 Carolina Street.

The eighty-ninth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

October 2018.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this building is: “ca. 1950; 1 story; Corner Grocery; concrete-block grocery with parapet front.” The building was classified as “non-contributing,” i.e. lacking historic value per the terms of the historic register. However, there is evidence of a grocery at the corner of Carolina and Carroll Streets as early as 1928.

In the 1928 and 1930 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory, William F. Peacock is listed as the owner of a grocery at 1114 Carolina Street. Peacock, who was white, lived at 706 Academy Street.

Thomas W. Thorne, also white, is listed as owner of the grocery at 1114 Carolina in the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory. The smaller attached building shown above seems to have been added during the previous decade, and Dublin Hargrove is listed as the proprietor of a fish market at 1114 1/2 Carolina.

In the 1947-48 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Winstead Geo (c; Martha) gro 1114 Carolina h 1110. Also, Annie’s Beauty Shop (c; Mrs Annie Aldridge) 1114 1/2 Carolina Street. The store was offered for sale late in 1947.

Wilson Daily Times, 27 November 1947.

Now empty and decaying, this building housed a corner store into the 21st century. This 2015 photograph shows a sign, hand-lettered by Louis S. Thomas, for Gray Boy’s, the last active grocery in the building.

Photographs by Lisa Y. Henderson.

Election Day.

At the entrance to my parents’ neighborhoods, signs for these candidates — George K. Butterfield for United States Congress, Milton F. “Toby” Fitch for North Carolina Senate, Jean Farmer Butterfield for North Carolina House of Representatives, and Calvin L. Woodard for Sheriff. I was struck by the deep roots that all have in Wilson County.

G.K. Butterfield’s earliest Davis ancestor, Judith Davis, arrived in the town of Wilson in 1855, and his grandfather Fred M. Davis Sr. led Jackson Chapel First Missionary Baptist Church for decades.

Toby Fitch’s maternal Dunstan ancestors were free people of color in antebellum Wilson County and his Whitteds and Beckwiths arrived before the turn of the 20th century.

“Farmer” is a classic Wilson name, and Jean Farmer Butterfield’s father Floyd Willie Farmer was a force in the effort to get Wilson County to build rural high schools for African-Americans in the 1940s.

Calvin L. Woodard is descended on his mother’s side from Benjamin and Violet Barnes, were well into middle age and newly freed from slavery when they registered their long marriage in Wilson County in 1866.

Artis’ Cafe padlocked.

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Wilson Daily Times, 13 February 1939.

  • June Scott Artis — A history of Stantonsburg gave the date of the cafe’s opening as 1947, which apparently was off by at least a decade. It remained in business into the 1960s.
  • Edgar Artis, June S. Artis’ son.
  • Walter Ward — The 6 February 1939 edition of the Wilson Daily Times reported that Ward pleaded guilty to manslaughter and received a 15 to 18-year sentence.
  • H.B. Swenson — H.B. Swinson died 28 January 1939. Per his death certificate, he was “murdered, knife wound of breast”; was born 18 April 1913 in Greene County to Allen Swinson and Henrietta Applewhite of Greene County; lived i Stantonsburg; and worked in farming.

500 East Green Street.

The eighty-eighth in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this house is: “ca. 1908; 1 story; John Barnes house; triple-A cottage with intact bracketed porch; Barnes was a brickmason.”

In the 1922, 1925, 1928 and 1930 city directories, John M. and Annie L. Barnes are listed at 500 East Green. Barnes’ occupation was given as plasterer in 1922 and bricklayer in 1925 and 1928.

In the 1940 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 500 East Green, bricklayer John M. Barnes, 69, and wife Annie L., 61.

Annie Lee Barnes died 3 May 1943 at Mercy Hospital in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 1 February 1879 in Wilson to Charles Henry Darden of Greene County and Dianna Scarborough of Wilson County; was married to John M. Barnes; resided at 500 East Green; and taught at the Sallie Barbour School. John M. Barnes was informant.

John M. Barnes died 27 April 1958 in Wilson. Per his death certificate, he was born in 1870 in Wayne County to Charles and Rebecca Pope Barnes; lived at 500 East Green; worked as a brickmason; was married to Cora Sherrod Barnes [daughter of Jack and Cassie Sherrod]; and was buried at Rest Haven. Thelma Byers was informant.

Cora Sherrod Barnes died 12 June 1972 in Wilson. Per her death certificate, she was born 13 December 1888 to Jack and Cassie Sherrod; resided at 500 East Green Street; was a retired teacher. Informant was Ralph Sherrod, 327 West 30th Street, New York City.

Photograph by Lisa Y. Henderson, October 2018.

1112 Carolina Street.

The eighty-seventh in a series of posts highlighting buildings in East Wilson Historic District, a national historic district located in Wilson, North Carolina. As originally approved, the district encompasses 858 contributing buildings and two contributing structures in a historically African-American section of Wilson. (A significant number have since been lost.) The district was developed between about 1890 to 1940 and includes notable examples of Queen Anne, Bungalow/American Craftsman, and Shotgun-style architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

As described in the nomination form for the East Wilson Historic District, this house is: “circa 1913; 1 story; two-room, central-hall house; turned porch posts; asphalt siding.”

The 1922 Sanborn fire insurance map of Wilson, N.C., shows 1112 Carolina Street.

In the fall of 1929, Bettie Lofton placed an ad seeking a cooking and general housework position:

Wilson Daily Times, 17 September 1929.

Lofton apparently rented her home out shortly after. (Perhaps because she married Thomas Morning in Wilson on 17 March 1930. The couple is listed together at 518 Hadley Street, Wilson, in the 1930 census)) In the 1930 census of Wilson, Wilson County: at 1112 Carolina, renting at $16/month, tobacco factory laborer Jessey Farmer, 34; wife Henerator, 26, laundress; and children Jessey Jr., 8, Irvin, 4, and Trumiller, 3.

In the 1941 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., city directory: Lofton Betty cook h 1112 Carolina

Wilson Daily Times, 12 December 1965.

Photograph by Lisa Y. Henderson, October 2018.

Where we worked: 1922 — G.

City directories offer fine-grained looks at a city’s residents at short intervals. The 1922 Hill’s Wilson, N.C., directory reveals the types of work available to African-Americans during the booming tobacco era. This post is the seventh in an alphabetical series listing all “colored” directory entries for whom an occupation was listed. The address is the resident’s home, unless a business address is noted.

  • Gaines, Charles, elevator operator, 203 Stantonsburg Road
  • Gaines, Dora, domestic, 528 Smith
  • Gardner, Alice, maid — Wilson Sanatorium, Sunshine Alley
  • Gardner, George, farmer, Spring Street Alley
  • Gardner, Preston, clerk — Peter Artis, Wiggins Street
  • Gardner, William, tobacco worker, 602 South Lodge
  • Garrity, Mary, teacher, 400 Stantonsburg Road
  • Gaston, Lorenzo, tobacco worker, 118 Manchester
  • Gaston, Mancie, barber — W.S. Hines, Elm City
  • Gaston, Sattena, dressmaker, 118 Manchester
  • Gay, Albert, porter, 623 East Green
  • Gay, Charles, tobacco worker, 625 East Green
  • Gay, Rachel, tobacco worker, 812 Robinson [Roberson]
  • Gay, William, tobacco worker, 713 Stantonsburg Road
  • Gear, Cora, maid, 505 East Nash
  • George, Arthur H., teacher, 401 North Vick
  • Gerald, Edgar, tobacco worker, 108 South Vick
  • Gibbs, James, tobacco worker, 604 Park Avenue
  • Gibbs, Priscilla, domestic, 604 Park Avenue
  • Gilchrist, Harrison, tobacco worker, 904 Mercer
  • Gilliam Cafe, 509 E Nash, Rachel Gilliam proprietor
  • Gilliam, Mary, domestic, 646 Wiggins
  • Gilliam, Matthew S., physician — 516 East Nash, 805 East Nash
  • Gilliam, Rachel, proprietor — Gilliam Cafe, 228 Smith
  • Gillis, Walter, helper, 411 South Goldsboro
  • Glenn, Price, laborer, 800 South Lodge
  • Globe Theatre (moving pictures), 543 East Nash
  • Godwin, Robert, laborer, 903 Robinson
  • Goffney, Clinton F., tobacco worker, 704 Suggs
  • Goffney, Joseph, tobacco worker, 206 Manchester
  • Goolsby, Kirby, helper, 536 East Nash
  • Gordon, Elmer, barber — W.S. Hines, 721 East Green
  • Gordon, Oscar C., hairdresser, 511 East Nash
  • Gorham, Ernest, laborer, 405 East Bank[s]
  • Gorham, George, tobacco worker, 417 South Goldsboro
  • Gowen, Walter, tobacco worker, 203 Stantonsburg Road
  • Graham, Henry, tobacco worker, 414 East Walnut
  • Grant, Mary, trained nurse, 203 Pender
  • Grantham, Dessimore, barber, 309 Forbes
  • Grantham, Garfield, carpenter, 908 Viola
  • Gray, Albert, tobacco worker, 606 South Lodge
  • Gray, Mattie, laundress, 606 South Lodge
  • Gray, Sam, tobacco worker, 105 Manchester
  • Green, Arthur, laborer, 202 Pender
  • Green, Edwin, tobacco worker, 13 Stantonsburg Road
  • Green, James, tobacco worker, 546 East Green
  • Green, Marion, laborer, 314 Pender
  • Green, Mary, domestic, 518 East Nash
  • Green, Minnie, laundress, 135 Narroway
  • Green, Missouri, laundress, 507 Grace
  • Green, Naomi, domestic, 202 Pender
  • Green, Nelson, grocer, 420 South Spring, 502 South Lodge
  • Green, Oscar, tobacco worker, 606 South Lodge
  • Green, Richard, Laborer, 314 Pender
  • Green, Walter, tobacco worker, 314 Pender
  • Green, Wash, laborer, 518 East Nash
  • Greenfield, Clarence, driver, 203 Stantonsburg Road
  • Greenfield, Luvenia, cook, 522 South Lodge
  • Griffin, Boston, tobacco worker, 503 Viola
  • Griffin, Mary, tobacco worker, 705 South Lodge
  • Griffis, Delia, laundress, 310 North East
  • Griffis, Donald, blacksmith, 310 North East
  • Griffis, John H., farmer, 310 North East
  • Grimes, Carrie, tobacco worker, 306 East Walnut
  • Grissom, Hattie, domestic, 201 North Vick
  • Grissom, Lydia, hairdresser, 201 North Vick
  • Gunn, Daniel, tobacco grader, 512 South Lodge, 514 South Lodge

Notes:

  • Peter Artis was a confectioner with a shop at 502 East Green.
  • Dessimore Grantham’s Forbes Street? I have never heard of it, and it’s not listed in the directory’s Guide to Streets.